United States Country Snapshot

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International Service Availability* Export U.S. Import U.S.
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United States Domestic Services Yes

*Availability of particular services may vary by origin and destination.  Availability of particular solutions may vary by service selected.  All services subject to the applicable FedEx Service Guide or FXF 100 Series Rules Tariff. 

Country Information

Capital: Washington, D.C.
Population: 313,847,465 est.
Language: English
Weights and Measures: U.S. Standard
Currency: US Dollar
100 cents equal 1 dollar
Time Zone East Coast (Detroit, Indianapolis, Miami, New York) = GMT - 6 hours
Midwest (Chicago, Dallas, Memphis) = GMT - 7 hours
Mountain (Denver, Phoenix, Salt Lake City)= GMT - 8 hours
Pacific (Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle) = GMT - 9 hours
Alaska, Hawaii = GMT - 11 hours
Daylight Savings Time is observed April through October (1 hour plus) except for Arizona and Hawaii.

 

 

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Trade Group Member

NAFTA, the North America Free Trade Agreement, provides for the elimination or progressive reduction of tariffs between the U.S., Canada and Mexico. The exemption or reduced tariff is applicable only to goods qualified under the agreement as originating goods.

US has many trade agreements with other countries. For the complete list of countries and the terms of the trade agreements, please visit: http://export.gov/FTA/index.asp 

Numerous bilateral and multilateral agreements such as the Agreement on Textiles and Clothing (formerly the Multi-fiber Agreement) are grouped under the umbrella of the WTO, the World Trade Organization, the successor to the GATT (General Agreement on Tariff and Trade). The WTO oversees most global trade in goods and services as negotiated in the various agreements; it also provides arbitration in case of disputes. MFN or Most Favored Nation tariff treatment is accorded to all countries who have ratified the WTO as well as to the other previous GATT members who have yet to ratify the accord.

CBI, the Caribbean Basin Initiative (also known as the CBERA, the Caribbean Basin Economic Recovery Act), provides duty-free entry for qualified products imported directly from Caribbean nations.

ATPA, the Andean Trade Preference Act, provides duty-free entry of eligible goods imported directly from Colombia and Ecuador.

CBTPA, the Caribbean Basin Trade Partnership Act, provides for reduced or free duty on qualified products imported directly from CBTPA beneficiary countries.

AGOA, the African Growth Opportunity Act, provides for reduced or free duty on qualified products imported directly from AGOA beneficiary countries.

FAS, Compact of Free Association, provides for duty-free entry for eligible goods directly imported to the U.S. from Palau, the Marshall Islands and the Federated States of Micronesia.

CITES, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of wild fauna and flora provides for the seizure of shipments prohibited under this agreement and the assessment of fines.

Under the U.S. Generalized System of Preference or GSP, duty-free entry is allowed for direct importation into the U.S. of eligible goods from designated developing countries.

APEC, the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation is considering the progressive elimination of tariffs among the Pacific Rim members (Brunei, Canada, China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, U.S.A.)

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General Import Clearance Information

Clearance Process

There are over 200 approved ports of entry throughout the United States. A list of entry ports is available in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 19 Part 101.3. Information on U.S import and export regulations is available in the Code of Federal Regulations with more recent updates appearing in the Federal Register, please visit: htp://www.gpoaccess.gov/cfr/index.html Although Title 15 (Foreign Trade) and Title 19 (Customs Duties) contain regulations that apply to most or all exports, many other Titles contain import and export requirements that are associated with specific regulatory agencies such as the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The U.S. government has several internet sites that provide general information on import and export requirements. For information on export licensing, you should visit the Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) website at www.bis.doc.gov. For information on trade agreements, import requirements, or trade contacts you should visit the U.S. Customs & Border Protection website (www.cbp.gov), the U.S. Department of Commerce International Trade Administration website (www.ita.doc.gov) or the U.S. International Trade Commission website (www.usitc.gov).

Document Requirements

Air Waybill - An air waybill serves as evidence to make entry for importations by a common carrier. 

Commercial Invoice - Required for most shipments. It must be in English or accompanied by a translation furnished by a party who is knowledgeable of the transaction. Required details include: a detailed description of the goods; quantity; currency and purchase price or fair market value; name and amount of other charges and rebates such as freight, insurance, commission, packing, assists. Specific invoice details are required for importation of a number of commodities including the following: For audio/video cassettes and tapes, the length and width of the tape, a brief synopsis of content and the reason for exportation. For textiles (unless provided on the textile declaration), the fabric breakdown, whether knit or woven and for clothing articles, the gender. For watches, the value and origin of each of the components (i.e., movement, strap, case and battery). For marked/mutilated samples, the words "mutilated samples: 9811.00.60: or "marked samples, not for resale" as applicable. For FDA shipments, the Product manufacturer name and address (the name and address of originating shipper, the country where the goods were last processed, the method used to make or process the product, the kind of packing material in contact with the product and the FDA product code.

Commercial Invoice Statements - A number of commodities require that a particular statement be provided on the invoice or on a separate form. Some commodities are eligible for preferential treatment (reduced duty) when the appropriate statement or declaration is provided. Among the most common statements are:

Shipments containing U.S. Goods Returned (USGR) require The Foreign Shipper Declaration of U.S. Goods Returned and Importer Declaration of U.S. Goods Returned to substantiate the USGR claim of duty-free entry treatment. The Commercial Invoice must indicate US as the country of manufacture. In addition to these declarations, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) may require other documentation or data to allow duty-free treatment.

Film and Video Certificate - The Certificate In Connection With the Importation of Films and Videos or Antipornographic Statement is required for imports of films and videos. The statement can be written on the invoice provided the specific wording of the standard form (CF 3291) is used.

TSCA Statement - The Toxic Substance Control Act statement is required for the importation of any chemical shipments and any materials in primary form such as paint, dye, stain, raw rubber and raw metal. It must be provided by the importer.

Quota Charge Statement (QCS) - A QCS is required for the importation of shipments that contain textiles or clothing from a country that is subject to textile quotas imposed by the U.S. Department of Commerce. (When a quota allocation is sold in the origin country, the cost is considered a quota charge.) Several versions of the statement are used depending on whether a quota charge was paid, and if so, whether the amount is included in the unit price or is not known. The statement can be provided on the invoice by either the exporter or the importer.

Artwork Statement - The artwork statement is required for duty-free entry of original works of art such as sculptures, etchings, engravings, and lithographs.

Antique Statement - A Certificate of Antiquity, or a similar statement on the invoice, is required to claim duty-free entry of goods over 100 years old. The statement must include the words "circa date" followed by the year of manufacture whether known or estimated.

Destination Control Statement - The exporter must include this statement on all copies of the invoice, waybill and export control documents unless the ECCN of the goods is EAR99 or the shipments is eligible for and exported under particular license exceptions.

Carnet - The ATA carnet is a document that may be used instead of the usual Customs documentation for the temporary duty-free entry of professional equipment, commercial samples and advertising material. The carnet is issued by the country of origin and is valid for one year. It must be validated by Customs upon import and re-export.

Certificate of Origin - Certain goods (textiles, wine, distilled spirits) require a certificate as a condition of import. A Certificate of Origin may also be required to substantiate claims for preferential treatment of eligible goods. Some trade agreement or regulations require that the exporter complete the Certificate (others allow it to be completed by the importer or another knowledgeable party) and require that the Certificate be notarized and be validated by a government agency or chamber of commerce.

Several certificate of origin versions exist. Among the most commonly used for US shipments are:

NAFTA (North American Free Trade Agreement) Certificate of Origin

CBTPA (Caribbean Basin Trade Preference Act) Certificate of Origin

  • AGOA (African Growth Opportunity Act) Textile Certificate of Origin
  • U.S./Israel Free Trade Agreement Certificate of Origin*
  • Certificate of Origin (for general use)*
  • *Both the general use Certificate and the US-Israel Certificate must be notarized and require a signature and seal from a Chamber of Commerce. The FedEx Certificate of Origin Preparation Desk (phone# 866-352-3252 option 3) can provide both to U.S. exporters for a reasonable fee.

Textiles All textile and apparel products imported into the U.S. are required to include the full name and address of the manufacturer for each item. Please note if items in a shipment were produced by multiple manufacturers, the full name and address must be provided for each manufacturer, with details of items and quantities produced by each. In addtion, the commercial invoice must include fabric composition and percentage (ex. 50% cotton, 50% polyester), gender, knit or woven details.

Country of Origin reporting for Textile and Apparel Items - U.S. Customs and Border Protection has issued a final rule regarding reporting of the Manufacturer Identification code (MID) for textile and apparel articles classified in Chapters 50 through 63 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedules (HTS).The final rule includes some changes from the interim rule which has been in effect since 2005; the final rule became effective upon publication, March 17, 2011. Commercial shipments of these items require reporting of the MID code of the actual manufacturer; in addition, commodities classified elsewhere in the tariff which have a three digit textile category number assigned to the specific heading also require reporting of the manufacturer's MID code.Non-commercial shipments of these same commodities do not require reporting of the manufacturer's MID; the MID can be that for the manufacturer, shipper, or exporter.

Declaration Textile Visa - A textile visa is an endorsement in the form of a stamp on an invoice or an export control license. It is issued to the shipper in the foreign country and is used to control exports of textiles and textile products to the U.S. An original copy of the visa must be submitted to Customs. The visa may be linked to quota restrictions. When under quota, the quantity imported must be verified and charged to the quota before release is granted. Properly marked or mutilated textile samples valued up to $800 may be exempted from visa and quota requirements.

  • Permits/Declarations - Permits or Declarations are required for importation and/or exportation of particular commodities that are subject to regulatory by certain agencies including the DEA (Drug Enforcement Agency) and FWS (Fish and Wildlife Service.) Import Licenses or permits are required for the following:
  • FDA Prior Notice of Imported Food Shipments and Registration of Food Facility
  • FDA must receive Prior Notice of food imported into the U.S. for human and animal consumption. The Prior Notice requires additional data elements and must be submitted electronically to FDA no more than five days before arrival and no fewer than four hours before arrival by air and two hours by land. For exceptions and more information, please visit FDA website and search keyword: Prior Notice.
  • All domestic and foreign facilities that manufacture, process, pack, and hold food for human or animal consumption in the U.S. must be registered with FDA prior to shipping. Foreign facilities are also required to designate a U.S. agent for registration purposes to act as liaison between FDA and the facility for both routine and emergency communications.
  • Cheese and cheese products (import license from USDA)
  • Milk and cream (import permit from FDA and USDA)
  • Plants and plant products (import permit from USDA; also FDA for fruits, vegetables and nuts)
  • Livestock and animals and parts of (permit from APHIS) imports are restricted to "quarantine" ports
  • Poultry and related products (import permits from FDA and USDA) exemption applies to imports from Canada
  • Firearms, ammunitions and explosives (import license from BATF)
  • Radioactive materials and nuclear reactors (import license from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission or from FDA if intended for Medical use)
  • Biological drugs (import license from FDA, from USDA, if for animal use)
  • Biological materials such as virus, serum, toxins (permit from U.S. Public Health Service)
  • Liquor and other alcoholic beverages (BATF import permit and certificate of label approval granted to licensed dealers only).
  • FCC 740 Statement Regarding the Importation of Radio Frequency Devices Capable of Causing Harmful Interference - Under the Federal Communication Commission rules, an FCC 740 form is required for any device or subassembly that sends, receives or is capable of interfering with radio frequencies. Examples include radio transmitters and receivers, tape recorders, stereos, TV's, cordless telephones, microwave, radio controlled security devices such as garage door openers, etc. (Shipments of cordless phones intended for the U.S. commerce require digital security encoding and this should be indicated on the invoice or on the individual packaging.)
  • Invoice Details for Footwear - All footwear shipments (excluding parts) require The Footwear Invoice Form (CF5523) or the footwear data elements in any format. This information may be provided by the exporter, shipper or manufacturer.
  • Declaration for Products Subject to Radiation Control Standards FDA 2877 - The Food and Drug Administration Form 2877 must be provided by the U.S. importer for shipments which contain radiation producing products (including sonic radiation) such as TV receivers, microwave ovens, X-ray equipment, laser products, ultrasound equipment and other radiation producing electronic devices.
  • Civil Aircraft Certificate - This certificate is required to obtain special duty or duty-free treatment of eligible parts of civil aircraft. (Not all aircraft or their parts are eligible. The U.S. Tariff details which goods are eligible.) It must be filed with U.S. Customs at the district port (for entry at any port within the district) or at the U.S. port of entry.
  • Blanket Certificates - Blanket certificates are certificates that are issued to authorize multiple imports of the same commodity. Blanket certificates may be submitted for FDA2877, for FCC740 as well as for certain preferential forms, the civil aircraft certificate, the textile declaration and footwear statement. 

Import Warnings Issued for Specific Food from Japan - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have issued import alerts regarding specific food products, including milk and vegetables, imported from areas of Japan affected by the ongoing nuclear crisis. The FDA issued an indication of detention without physical examination (DWPE). Detained products may be released after detention by providing evidence either that:

  1. The products do not originate from the perfectrures of Fukushima, Gunman, Ibaraki and Tochigi in Japan; or
  2. The products do not violate acceptable levels of radionuclide contamination by means of laboratory analysis

FDA Guidance for Products Imported from Tianjin, China - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is informing US importers of intended increased surveillance of certain FDA regulated products imported from the industrial center Binhai New Area in Tianjin, China. Click here for more information.

Medical Devices

when importing medical devices,electronic product components, parts and finished product. FDA recommends the submission of consistent and accurate identifiers for firms, correct product codes for the products being imported and the Affirmation of Compliance (AofC) Codes with the appropriate qualifier. The more detailed device information provided on the Commercial Invoice and shipping documents the better. Without the proper information, the FDA may initiate a manual review of each line of entry, which may lead to delays in its release to the importer/consignee.

Customs Valuation

The value to declare for Customs purposes is the price paid or payable for the goods.  Any selling commissions, assists, royalties, packing and proceeds must also be factored in and is a part of the value.  Failure to include the above is undervaluing the goods and may result in penalties. Duty is assessed on the price paid and does not include freight and insurance charges. All prices in foreign currency must be converted to U.S. dollars to assess duty on the amount.

Import Duties

All goods coming into the United States must clear customs and are subject to a customs duty unless specifically exempted from this duty by law. Rates are determined by the classification of goods within the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTSUS). Several rates of duty are possible for each item: "general" rates for most nations; "special" rates (which are lower than the general rates) for goods eligible under special trade programs; and "column 2" rates for imports not eligible for either general or special rates. Customs duties are usually an "ad valorem" rate (a percentage) that is applied to the value of the imported goods. However, some goods are dutiable at a specific rate of duty (so many cents per piece, kilo, liter, etc.) or are dutiable at a compound rate of duty (a combination of both "ad valorem" and specific rates). Customs duty is based on the transaction value of the merchandise. Transaction value is the price the buyer actually pays the seller for the goods being imported plus other costs including, but not limited to, packing costs and royalty fees incurred by the buyer.

Antidumping

In some circumstances, Customs will assess antidumping duties or countervailing duties in addition to the normal import duties. Antidumping duties are assessed on imported merchandise sold in the U.S. at less than the normal price of the good in the manufacturer's home market (also called fair market value). Countervailing duties are assessed to counter the effects of subsidies provided by the foreign government for merchandise exported to the U.S. resulting in artificially low prices that are detrimental to U.S. industries.

Excise Duties

Alcohol and tobacco are subject to excise duties.

Additional Duties  

Duty/Tax Exemptions

The U.S. exempts certain persons and certain goods from payment of import duties and taxes providing regulatory requirements are met. Some common exemptions include:

  • Original works of art, articles for exhibition
  • Sculptures and regalia imported by a public or nonprofit institution for educations, scientific, etc. purposes.
  • Certain goods imported by a religious institution
  • U.S. government importations
  • Gifts providing that the customs value less than $100 per person and they are marked as gifts
  • U.S.-origin goods previously exported and returned in an unaltered condition
  • Goods previously exported for exhibition, trade show use, scientific purposes, etc. that and returned in an unaltered condition to the party who exported them
  • Personal effects (clothing, toilet articles, etc.) owned by the importer and imported for personal use
  • Equipment of groups arriving in the U.S. of goodwill visits (at the request of the Department of State) providing that the equipment will be re-exported or destroyed at the conclusion of the visit.
  • Goods entered temporarily under a carnet or a temporary importation bond (TIB). (Shipments traveling under a Carnet are prohibited via FedEx International Express Services. (Shipments moving under this provision may move via FedEx Airport to Airport Service on an 023 air waybill.)
  • Shipments intended for entry under a TIB must be sent under the Broker Selection Option (BSO) with the name, address and phone number of the importer's customs broker indicated.

Drawback

A refund or remission of customs duty by means of drawback provisions is permitted under U.S. law. However, due to the regulatory requirements associated with drawback, importation and exportation of goods intended for drawback claims are prohibited via FedEx International Express Services. (Shipments moving under this provision may move via FedEx Airport to Airport Service on an 023 air waybill.) Warehouse goods Duty/Tax are not payable on goods that are imported (under bond). However, duty/tax becomes payable when the goods are removed from the warehouse. Goods being entered as warehoused goods into the United States or exported from a warehouse are prohibited via FedEx Express Services. (Shipments moving under this provision may move via FedEx Airport to Airport Service on an 023 air waybill.)

Import Taxes

Although the U.S. does not impose a standard federal tax on imported goods, the importer's state government may assess taxes (such as a sales tax). Some goods (such as alcoholic beverages, cigarettes, etc.) are subject to federal excise or stamp taxes.

Customs Fees

A Merchandise Processing Fee (MPF) is assessed on all formal entries, with a few exceptions. Exceptions include goods that qualify for preferential treatment under certain trade agreements (including but not limited to NAFTA and CBERA) and those entered under special provisions (including but not limited to unaltered U.S.-origin goods and goods of distinguished foreign visitors). Effective October 1, 2011 - MPF is increased from the current rate of 0.21 to 0.3464%.  U.S. Importers will incur a higher rate of MPF for shipments valued between $7,217USD and $140,012USD from 0.21% to 0.3464% of entered/dutiable value on the import clearance entry.  Minimum MPF of $25.00 will apply to shipments valued up to $7,217; shipments valued at $140,012 and higher will incur the maximum MPF of $485.00.  No special documentation required. MPF is assessed at time of entry summary completion. Copy of entry summary showing MPF rate and amount paid is provided to customer with duty/tax invoice.  U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) will not accept entry summary without payment of MPF effective on date of entry. Failure to remit accurate MPF will result in fine or penalty for late submission of entry summary. Fees may be charged by government agencies to cover costs associated with inspections and/or permit and license applications. Please check with the appropriate agency for details.

Exchange Controls  

There are no exchange controls.

Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT's)  

Technical barriers or non-tariff barriers to trade as they are sometimes known, can cause many problems for exporters looking for new markets for their products.  These barriers can be in the form of regulations, standards, testing and certification procedures.  The World Trade Organization (WTO) Agreement on Technical Barriers to Trade tries to ensure that these barriers do not create unnecessary obstacles.  To obtain further information on Technical Barriers to Trade as well as Notifications on technical regulations and conformity assessment procedures, go to the WTO website at http://www.wto.org/english/tratop_e/tbt_e/tbt_e.htm  

Consular Fees  

There are no consular fees.  

Import Clearance Process (For exporters shipping goods to the United States and for United States residents and businesses importing goods from other countries.)

The United States requires customs entry for all merchandise that is brought into U.S. customs territory except for goods identified in 19CFR141.4 (which includes articles that were undeliverable in a foreign country and records, diagrams and other data with regard to any business, engineering or exploration operation). Except for goods entering the U.S. in possession of a traveler, customs clearance is usually done electronically through the Automated Broker Interface (ABI) program of the Automated Commercial Systems (ACS) by either the importer or by a licensed customs broker on behalf of the importer, purchaser or consignee of a shipment.A Most shipments are admitted for consumption and are assessed duty and tax upon arrival. (For information on admission for other purposes, see below.) The common types of customs entry are:

  • Non-Entry: Permitted for goods listed in General Note 18 of the U.S. Tariff.
  • Informal: Permitted for most goods providing shipment value is less than $2,500.
  • Formal: Required for shipments valued at $2,500 or more and, at a lower value, for shipments containing certain goods. (Some formal entries are called "live" entries because all applicable entry documents and all duties must be presented before Customs will release the goods for delivery. In the case of goods subject to quota, this means that quota processing must be completed also.)

Customs entry is focused on 2 issues; first, admissibility (whether the goods meet conditions for entry) and second, on duty assessment and collection. Many shipments are released for delivery after Customs has determined that the goods are admissible and is assured that duty will be paid. (Customs entry is not legally completed until after the shipment has physically arrived, duties have been paid, and delivery of the goods has been authorized by Customs. U.S. importers are generally required to provide the following documents for entry purposes in addition to Customs Forms that are specific to entry filing. Exceptions exist for express consignments (i.e. FedEx International Express Services), for certain goods, and when Customs determines that information submitted electronically via ABI is satisfactory.

  • a bill of lading (or an air waybill or carrier's certificate)
  • a commercial or pro-forma invoice
  • any other documents necessary to determine merchandise admissibility
  • When applicable, packing lists and other documents such as Certificate of Origin (for special treatment)

Agency Requirements In addition to the basic entry requirements noted above, certain goods are subject to regulatory control by other U.S. federal, state and local authorities. In order to ensure that goods are admissible, shipment information is made available to these agencies prior to customs release. Goods subject these controls must be released by the regulating agencies before Customs will authorize delivery or customs clearance. (For specific information, please contact the appropriate agency.) Shipment information is generally submitted to:

  • Department of Agriculture (USDA): Animals, plants and products derived for them or intended for use on animals
  • Food & Drug Administration (FDA): Products intended for human use
  • Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA): Narcotics, chemical precursors, and pill-making and capsule-filling machines.
  • Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms (ATF)
  • Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS): Non-domesticated animals and plants (furs, skins, shells, ginseng, etc.) FedEx will now able to clear shipments of wildlife products at five of our six clearance gateway locations: Anchorage, Alaska, Newark, New Jersey, Memphis, Tennessee, Miami, Florida, and Oakland, California. Note: Wildlife shipments arriving at the port of Indianapolis, Indiana (a non-designated port) will move in-bond to one of our designated clearance locations for proper clearance. Additional transit time may be required.
  • Department of Transportation (DOT): Motor vehicles and equipment
  • Federal Communications Commission (FCC): Devices capable of affecting radio frequencies

Other Import Requirements Inspection

U.S. Customs and other regulatory agencies have the right to examine and take samples of goods entering the U.S. to ensure compliance with U.S. law and accurate assessment of duties. Shipments selected for inspection prior to release for delivery may experience customs delays. When Customs has released goods for immediate delivery prior to customs clearance, the importer is required to comply with post-delivery requests to submit the packages and or sample quantities to Customs.

Record-keeping

An owner, importer, consignee or anyone who files a customs entry is required by law to keep records related to imported goods. Generally records should be kept for 5 years from the date of the entry or an activity involving the entry (such as closure of a Temporary Importation Bond). Specific requirements are available in Title 19 of the Code of Federal Regulation - available at http://ecfr.gpoaccess.gov/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=ecfr&tpl=/ecfrbrowse/Title19/19tab_02.tpl. Monetary penalties (for each customs release) and other disciplinary actions may be imposed for failures to produce required records (when requested by Customs).

FDA Prior Notice of Imported Food Shipments and Registration of Food Facility

FDA must receive Prior Notice of food imported into the U.S. for human and animal consumption. The Prior Notice requires additional data elements and must be submitted electronically to FDA no more than five days before arrival and no fewer than four hours before arrival by air and two hours by land. For exceptions and more information, please visit Food and Drug Administration available at www.fda.gov/oc/bioterrorism/bioact.html All domestic and foreign facilities that manufacture, process, pack, and hold food for human or animal consumption in the U.S. must be registered with FDA prior to shipping. Foreign facilities are also required to designate a U.S. agent for registration purposes to act as liaison between FDA and the facility for both routine and emergency communications.

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United States Import Prohibitions

The following items are prohibited into the United States of America by law: (via FedEx Express service)

  • White phosphorus matches
  • All pipes related to the use of illicit drugs such as 'smoking pipes' used as drug
    paraphernalia
  • Immoral articles (as defined in 19CFR12.40) including films, pictures, writings, etc.
  • Merchandise produced by convict, forced or indentured labor (as defined in 19CFR12.42)
  • Counterfeit coins, stamps, currency or other monetary securities of any government and any plates, dies or apparatus used to create such counterfeits.
  • Switchblade/Balisong/gravity/ballistic knives
  • Merchandise from countries under U.S. Sanction or embargo
  • Articles containing dog or cat fur
  • Certain foodstuffs and carpets of Iranian origin (this applies to personal and commercial use)
  • Kinder Surprise Eggs (Easter Chocolate Eggs with surprise inside)
  • Petroleum or petroleum products of Syrian origin Importation of prescription drugs by an individual U.S. consumer for personal use is prohibited unless FDA approved. There are exceptions/restrictions: 1. prescription drugs, which are made in the U.S. and then exported, can only be returned to the U.S. manufacturer. 2. Under limited circumstances as defined and allowed by FDA regulations, a small quantity of a prescription drug for personal use might be eligible for import in which case the following minimum information and documentation must be included on the commercial invoice and accompany the shipment: a copy of a valid, written doctor's prescription; complete name, address and phone number of the U.S. licensed treating physician, name and address of the drug manufacturer; form of medicine (tablets, capsules, liquid, etc); quantity; type of packaging; type of medical condition being treated; if the medication can be purchased in the U.S.; dosage and strength. Effective August 3, 2007 commercial shipments of live pigs, swine meat and by-products from the United Kingdom (England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland) are prohibited and will be refused entry and must be destroyed or exported.
  • Hemp products such as cosmetics, clothing, food, etc. that contains tetrahydrocannabinols (THC)
  • African Elephant Ivory is prohibited except for certain manufactured items with “worked” elephant ivory that was legally acquired and removed from the wild prior to February 26, 1976  if the commodity contains less than 200 grams of ivory and meet the following: Items that are part of a household move, inheritance, or traveling exhibition, Law enforcement and bona fide scientific specimens, Musical instruments, Furniture pieces and Firearms.

The following items are prohibited via FedEx Ground service: (Canada to US) The following list summarizes items not accepted by FedEx Ground for transport. This list is not all-inclusive and is subject to change without notice. FedEx Ground reserves the right to open and inspect any package tendered to it for transportation. FedEX Ground will refuse and return any shipment that is considered unsafe or unlawful to transport. Shipper agrees not to tender any packages containing hazardous materials or dangerous goods for shipment. Shipper agrees to declare on its manifest each package requiring additional handling. The following items are prohibited from shipment within Canada and to the US:

  •  
    • Alcohol beverages.
    • Animals, such as birds, fish, reptiles, dead animals or animals that have been mounted.
    • Articles of unusual value, such as priceless art, jewelry, collectibles, and antiques.
    • Cash, coins, currency, stamps, negotiable stocks, bonds, bank drafts, cash letters, and other negotiable instruments equivalent to cash.
    • Common fireworks.
    • Containers of liquids with a volume exceeding 8 gallons (32 litres) or 70 lbs. (32 kg) in weight.
    • Cut flowers.
    • Dangerous Goods or Hazardous Materials: Corrosives, explosives, toxics, or other substances including Other Regulated Materials (ORM-Ds) controlled by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and/or Transport Canada and Environment Canada.
    • Explosives, fireworks, flares, matches.
    • Flammable goods.
    • Furs.
    • Hazardous Materials, hazardous waste, including, but not limited to, used hypodermic needles, syringes or other medical wastes, and biohazards such as blood, urine, fluids and other noninfectious diagnostic specimens.
    • Human or animal remains, corpses, organs, embryos, body parts, or cremated or disinterred human remains.
    • Improperly packaged shipments.
    • Lottery tickets and gambling devices where prohibited by federal/national, provincial, state or local law.
    • Packages that are wet, leaking or that emit an odor of any kind.
    • Perishables, including, but not limited to, food, foodstuffs, beverages requiring refrigeration, pharmaceuticals.
    • Personal Effects (i.e. household articles, household furnishings, and/or clothing, often associated with a customer relocating from one residence to another).
    • Plants, plant materials, seeds, including cut flowers.
    • Pornographic materials.
    • Shipments that may ccause damage to, or delay of, equipment, personnel or other shipments.
    • Shipments that require FedEx Ground to obtain any special license or permit for transportation, importation or exportation.
    • Tobacco, cigarettes, tobacco products.
    • Unaccompanied baggage.
    • Used gasoline tanks (filled or empty) or any used gasoline-powered device or equipment with an integral fuel tank (full or empty). New, empty gasoline tanks or gasoline-powered devices are acceptable in original unopened packaging.
    • Any articles which require a U.S. Department of State import license or a Canadian Export Permit.
    • Any shipment moving under an A.T.A. carnet.

 

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General Import Restrictions

 

You are prohibited from tendering the following items for shipment to any international destinations unless otherwise indicated, and you agree not to do so. (Additional restrictions may apply depending on destination. Various regulatory clearances in addition to customs clearance may be required for certain commodities, thereby extending the transit time.)

  1. APO/FPO addresses.
  2. C.O.D. shipments.
  3. Human corpses, human organs or body parts, human and animal embryos, or cremated or disinterred human remains.
  4. Explosives (Class 1.4 explosives are acceptable for carriage to Canada, Germany, France, Japan, United Arab Emirates and United Kingdom. Note: United Arab Emirates only allows Class 1.4 explosives to be shipped hold-for-pickup to the FedEx Express facility in Dubai).
  5. Items resembling a bomb, hand grenade or other explosive device, except as provided in the Dangerous Goods section. This includes, but is not limited to, inert products such as novelty items, training aids and works of art.
  6. Firearms, weaponry and their parts (acceptable between the U.S. and Puerto Rico).
  7. Perishable foodstuffs and foods and beverages requiring refrigeration or other environmental control. An exception is available by contract only. Contact your FedEx account executive for information.
  8. Live animals including insects, except as provided in the Live Animals section in the FedEx Service Guide. (Call the FedEx Live Animal Desk at 1.800.405.9052).
  9. Plants and plant material, including cut flowers (cut flowers are acceptable from the U.S. to selected points in Canada and from Colombia, Ecuador and the Netherlands to the U.S.).
  10. Lottery tickets and gambling devices where prohibited by law.
  11. Money (coins, cash, currency, paper money and negotiable instruments equivalent to cash such as endorsed stocks, bonds and cash letters).
  12. Pornographic and/or obscene material.
  13. Shipments being processed under:
    1. Duty drawbacks claims unless advance arrangements are made.
    2. Temporary Import Bonds – acceptable under the FedEx International Broker Select option, for initial import only.
    3. U.S. State Department licenses
    4. Carnets
    5. U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration export permit.
    6. Letters of Credit. Shipments subject to Letters of Credit are generally prohibited, with the exception of shipments subject to Letters of Credit calling for a “courier receipt”, as defined by Article 25 of UCP 600, shipped using the FedEx Expanded Service International Air Waybill.
    7. Certificate of Registration shipments (CF4455).


  14. Hazardous waste, including, but not limited to, used hypodermic needles or syringes transported for sterilization, recycling, disposal or for any other purpose, or other medical waste.
  15. Shipments that may cause damage to, or delay of, equipment, personnel or other shipments.
  16. Shipments that require us to obtain any special licenses or permit for transportation, importation or exportation.
  17. Shipments or commodities whose carriage, importation or exportation is prohibited by any law, statute or regulation.
  18. Counterfeit goods, including, but not limited to, goods under a trademark, without the approval or oversight of the registered trademark owner (also commonly referred to as "fake goods" or "knock-offs").
  19. Marijuana, as defined by U.S. federal law, 21 U.S.C. 802(16), including marijuana intended for recreational or medicinal use, and synthetic cannabinoids.
  20. Shipments with a declared value for customs in excess of that permitted for a specific destination. (See the Declared Value for Carriage and Limits of Liability section in the FedEx Service Guide).
  21. Dangerous goods except as permitted under the Dangerous Goods section of these terms and conditions.
  22. Processed or unprocessed dead animals, including insects and pets. Taxidermy-finished hunting trophies or completely processed (dried) specimens of whole animals or parts of animals are acceptable for shipment into the U.S.
  23. Packages that are wet, leaking or emit an odor of any kind.
  24. Wildlife products that require U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service export clearance by FedEx prior to exportation from the U.S.
  25. In-bond shipments destined to or being withdrawn from a Foreign Trade Zone or bonded warehouse, unless the FedEx International Broker Select option is selected for U.S. import shipments, or the FedEx International Controlled Export service option is selected for U.S. export shipments.

Notwithstanding any other provision of the FedEx Service Guide, we are not liable for delay of, loss of damage to a shipment of any prohibited item. The shipper agrees to indemnity FedEx for any and all costs, fees and expenses FedEx incurs as a result of the shipper's violation of any local, state or federal laws or regulations or from tendering any prohibited item for shipment.

You may be able to ship these items via FedEx International Controlled Export, FedEx International Premium, FedEx International Express Freight (IXF) or FedEx International Airport-to-Airport (ATA). For information on FedEx International Controlled Export, call International Customer Service at 1.800.GoFedEx 1.800.463.3339 (say "international services"). For information on the other services listed call FedEx Express Freight Customer Service at 1.800.332.0807.

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United States Restrictions

The importation of certain products into the United States is restricted in order to protect the economy and safety of the United States and its citizens. The restrictions may be imposed by U.S. Customs, by another U.S. agency which has regulatory authority over a particular product, or by a State government into which the goods will be transported or are consigned. Restrictions include:

  • Import quotas
  • Import and/or export permits, license, visas, certificates
  • Labeling and/or marking requirements
  • Inspection
  • Clearance for certain goods being allowed only at certain designated ports
  • Antiques are excluded from the African Elephant Ivory provision, however to qualify for the Endangered Species Act (ESA) antiques exemption, an item must meet the following (and the seller, importer, or exporter must demonstrate): 100 years or older, Composed in whole or in part of an ESA-listed species; has not been repaired or modified with any such species after December 27, 1973; and is being or was imported through an endangered species “antique” port. For specific details visit:  https://www.fws.gov/international/pdf/african-elephant-4d-proposed-changes.pdf

The following goods are restricted by law and are subject to regulatory agency approval but are acceptable for importation on FedEx's International Priority Services:

  • Viruses, Serums, Toxins, Anti-Toxins and analogous products
  • Domestic Animal Products and Animal Feeding Material
  • Products derived from Wild Animals, Birds and Insects (furs, eggs, plumage, honey, etc.)
  • Seeds and non-propagating Agricultural Products
  • Non-perishable Foodstuffs (canned goods, etc.)
  • Motor vehicles, Boats and their associated equipment
  • Electronic Products
  • Cultural Property, including Pre-Columbian monumental or architectural sculpture or mural
  • Textiles, Wool and Fur Products
  • Chemical substances (including Fertilizers and Pesticides)
  • Medicine, Medical Devices, Cosmetics
  • Liquors, Alcohol
  • Nuclear/Radioactive Materials
  • Import of hemp seeds must be sterilized
  • Hemp products such as cosmetics, clothing, food, etc. is acceptable if they do not contain tetrahydrocannabinols (THC)
  • Import of Hemp Seeds must be sterilized. Import Permits may be required.


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Special Import Provisions

U.S. Origin Goods

The U.S. allows exemption from duty and tax for goods of US origin that have been exported and returned without having been advanced in value or improved in condition. To claim this exemption, the statement  "U.S. Goods returned, HS#9801.00" should be placed on the air waybill and other shipping documents. The foreign exporter and the U.S. importer should be prepared to provide additional documentation, especially if the goods are not clearly marked as U.S. goods.)

Free Zones There are currently over 200 Free Trade Zones in the U.S.  Most are located near one of the customs ports of entry.  A list of Foreign Trade Zone locations and contacts is available from the Foreign Trade Zones Board website at http://ia.ita.doc.gov/ftzpage

FedEx Clearance Ports FedEx's major ports of clearance are located in Newark, New Jersey; in Memphis, Tennessee; in Indianapolis, Indiana; in Oakland, California and in Anchorage, Alaska.

Temporary Imports Not all shipments which arrive in the United States are intended for consumption or to stay permanently. U.S. regulations have special entry provisions and conditions that are available for these other types of shipments. However, because of the special documentation and/or processing required, they may be prohibited by FedEx for importation on FedEx International Express Services or may be acceptable only if the shipment is designated for the Broker Select Option. Clearance delays should be expected.

  • Temporary Importation under Bond (TIB): Importers can enter certain classes of goods into U.S. customs territory temporarily free of duty by posting a bond. In the bond the importer agrees to export or destroy the goods within a specified time or pay damages, generally equal to twice the normal duty. Articles entered as TIBs must not be sold within the United States. The importer should co-ordinate arrangements with their customs broker prior to initiating import, destruction, or re-export.
  • Warehouse Entry, Foreign Trade Zone (FTZ) Entry: Goods can be entered in a warehouse or FTZ for various purposes such as storage, manufacturing and other manipulations. Special requirements and documentation exist. For more information, please consult a customs broker.
  • Carnet: Several types of carnet exist. However, they may all used be used as an entry document for the temporary admission of goods. Goods entered on a Carnet must be re-exported under customs supervision and meet all other conditions of the Carnet.
  • Goods returned for Repair, Testing, Experimental Purposes: Goods of non-U.S. origin sent to the U.S. for repair are subject to duty and tax assessment unless entered under a TIB. Goods of U.S. origin are allowed duty and tax free entry under certain conditions. (See section above regarding U.S. origin goods.)

 

Personal Effects

U.S. residents are entitled to duty and tax free entry of all personal and household goods taken abroad providing they have not been advanced in value or improved in condition. To facilitate duty-free re-entry, items of foreign origin (such as watches, cameras, tape recorders, or other articles which may be readily identified by serial number or permanently affixed marking) may be taken to the nearest Customs office and registered before departure on the Certificate of Registration (CF 4455). The certificate is valid for any future trips as long as the information on it remains legible. (Duty may be assessed on foreign-made personal articles taken abroad each time they are brought back into the US unless there is acceptable proof of prior possession.)

Foreign visitors (non-residents) are also entitled to duty and tax-free entry of personal effects with certain limitations. The goods must have been owned by and in the possession of the non-resident prior to his departure for the United States. They must be intended for the personal use of their owner and not intended as a gift or for resale. Quantity limits apply to tobacco products and alcoholic beverages.

When shipping personal effects to the U.S., the importer should provide the following documents for the sender to include with the shipping documents: a copy of any CF4455's, a completed CF3299 Declaration of Free Entry of Unaccompanied Articles. The sender should state on the air waybill and other shipping documents that the contents are personal effects.

 

Samples

U.S. regulations have special entry provisions and conditions for certain categories of samples. If the samples are intended for temporary importation, please see the Temporary Import section below.

  • Duty Exempt: Samples for Soliciting Orders / Mutilated Samples: Samples may be eligible for duty-free entry under the provision HS 9811.00.60. It applies only to merchandise being entered for the solicitation of orders for products of foreign countries. In addition, it requires that the sample be valued at $1 (or less) or that it be marked, torn, perforated, or otherwise treated so that it is unsuitable for sale or for use otherwise than as a sample in its imported condition. Merchandise must have been properly mutilated or marked prior to its importation into the United States. It cannot be mutilated or marked to conform to these requirements after its arrival into the United States. In addition, the invoice must contain the statement "Mutilated samples - 9811.00.60" prior to importation into the United States. This statement cannot be added in the United States.
  • Exempt from Textile Visa / Marked Samples: Textile samples from most countries are exempt from quota and visa requirements if certain conditions are met even though the samples are not exempt from duty, tax, commercial invoice or textile declaration requirements. To qualify, sample shipments may be equal to or less than $800, "Marked Sample Not for Resale" must be stated on the invoice (and air waybill, preferably), and the goods must be marked in accordance with Customs Directive 3500-07. For more information, visit the Customs website.

 

Gifts

Gift shipments must be from an individual to an individual or from a company to an individual. Shipment from business to business are considerred commercial, not gifts. It must have a retail value of $100.00 USD or less, per recipient, per day. Gifts from the U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, and American Samoa must have a retail value of $200.00 USD or less per recipient, per day. It must be properly marked as 'gift' on the outside of the box. Documentation required: Air Waybill and Pro Forma/Commercial Invoice. The following critical information must be provided on the invoice:

  • Complete name, address, and phone number of both the shipper and consignee
  • Complete description of the product(s), including if the item is homemade or store-bought.
  • For consolidated gift shipments, list the names of each individual receiving a gift, the gift item(s) fro each individual and the value of each item. The total gift value for each individual must not exceed the above-mentioned value limits.
  • A statement indicating that shipment is an 'unsolicited gift, not for resale'

Products with Special/Additional Requirements:

  • Non-Perishable Food Items - homemade or store-bought food items sent from an individual to an individual, valued under $200.00 USD, do not require submission of FDA Prior Notice.
  • Note: Perishable foodstuffs are prohibited from FedEx International Express Service.
  • Textiles - quota limitations on textiles and apparel items do not apply to gift shipments.
  • Alcoholic Beverages, Cigars and Cigarettes from an indivdiual to an individual are prohibited from FedEx International Express Service. Cuban cigars are prohibited entry into the United States.
  • Perfume containing alcohol are excluded from the gift provisions and may be subject to duty/tax and formal entry filing.
  • Personal and Household Effects - articles purchased soley for the personal use of an individual and shipped unaccompanied, will be entered under separate Customs provisions, not as a gift.
  • Caviar requires clearance at a Fish and Wildlife port and a CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) permit is required.


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Standards

Marking / Labeling All goods of foreign origin must be legibly, indelibly and permanently marked with the English name of the country of origin unless they meet the exception requirements in the regulations. (The requirement generally applies to individual units.) When marking is not feasible, such as when the article is too small or marking would in some way damage the merchandise, then the packaging or container that will reach the ultimate consumer must be marked. Specific requirements on country or origin marking methods and requirements are available in Title 19, Part 134 of the Code of Federal Regulation (19CFR134)  please visit: http://www.gpoaccess.gov/cfr/index.html  Certain goods (partial list below) have special packing or marking requirements set by US Customs or by an agency with regulatory control of the goods. For more information, please review 19 CFR 11 and other agency regulations such as 27CFR (Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms) and 16CFR (Federal Trade Commission) that are applicable.

  • Watch, clock and timing apparatus
  • Household appliances
  • Medicinal preparations and perfumery
  • Cigars, cigarettes, manufactured tobacco
  • Distilled spirits, wine and other alcoholic beverages
  • Wool and fur products
  • Textile products

Counterfeiting - U.S.Customs Borders Protection (CBP) published an interim rule which allows disclosure of alleged counterfeit Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) information to an actual rights holder in order to determine if the mark is valid or counterfeit. Under these new provisions, CBP may provide information to valid rights holders in the form of photographs or a sample of the goods in question, as well as information appearing on packaging. The importer of the alleged violative merchandise will have seven days to submit information demonstrating the merchandise is not counterfeit; failing such proof, CBP will seize the merchandise.

 
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General Export Clearance Information

Clearance Process

Working with Customs officials throughout the world, FedEx has developed innovative technology to eliminate many paperwork-handling steps and expedite the movement of international shipments. This is the FedEx Expressclear electronic Customs clearance system. Starting at the origin, state-of-the-art technology allows the processing of shipment paperwork and electronic transmission of documents to the designated FedEx hub and destination clearance location. The Expressclear system also keeps a database of regulatory information which includes importers numbers, broker designation, corporate contact names and telephone numbers. At a FedEx hub, international shipments are sorted, scanned and loaded onto an international flight. Vital shipment information is keyed into a worldwide manifest database that is linked to computer systems operated by brokers and Customs officials in many countries. Even before the plane has taken off, or while it is in the air, Customs agents and brokers at the destination airport of entry can begin examining shipping manifests, querying air waybill data if they need more details, assessing duties and taxes and selecting which shipments they wish to examine. By the time the plane arrives at his destination, many packages have already been cleared by Customs. As the plane is unloaded, the Expressclear system identifies packages to be examined and prints "cleared" Customs labels for all others. Cleared shipments can be transferred to trucks for immediate delivery. International shipments are scanned at all key points throughout the process and allows for up-to-date status reports including when Customs clearance is obtained.  

Document Requirements Export Licenses - Specific export licenses are required for commodities subject to export controls. The Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) is the primary licensing agency for dual use exports (commercial items which could have military applications). Other departments and agencies have regulatory jurisdiction and issue licenses for controlled substances and precursor chemicals; for endangered fish and wildlife species; for defense services and articles; for arms and munitions; for nuclear material, equipment and technology; for fuels; for drugs and medical devices. Specific questions pertaining to commodity licensing requirements should be directed to the lead agency. International Traffic in Arms (ITAR) to require mandatory electronic filing through the Automated Export System (AES) for exports of U.S. Munitions List (USML) hardware using a U.S. port that require the filing of shipper's export information. There is a mandatory electronic filing via the Automated Export System (AES) of exports of rough diamonds classified under Harmonized Tariff Schedule (HTS) subheadings 7102.10, 7102.21, and 7102.31.

Electronic Export Information (EEI) Formerly Known As Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) - SED/EEI is required for all shipments leaving the U.S., Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands and other U.S. possessions with certain exceptions. This must be filed through the Automated Export System (AES) or through AES Direct by the exporter or its authorized agent. The paper SED (Form 7525-V) cannot be filed under any circumstances. The U.S. Census Bureau eliminated the use of Social Security Numbers (SSNs) for identification purposes when registering to file and when filing electronic export information in the Automated Export System (AES) or AES Direct.

Export Clearance Process (For United States residents and businesses exporting goods to other countries.)

General Export Requirements

Exporters are responsible for filing an Electronic Export Information (EEI) formerly known as Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) for all shipments leaving the U.S., Puerto Rico, the U.S Virgin Islands and other U.S. possessions with certain exceptions. The paper SED (Form 7525-V) cannot be filed under any circumstances. It is now required to be filed via the Automated Export System (AES).  You can now authorize FedEx to file SED/EEI as your agent when preparing shipments on fedex.com. FedEx Export AgentFile was designed to provide exporters with a streamlined SED/EEI filing and shipping label preparation process for regulatory compliance. The tool stores all of your filings, creating a record you can access online any time within 45 days. The user interface is easy to use and guides you through all of the important steps. For more information, please visit http://www.fedex.com/us/sed/ All exporters are obligated to comply with the U.S. Export Administration Regulations (EAR). To comply with their obligations, an exporter should determine the end-user and ultimate end-use of the exported goods, the ultimate destination, and the Export Commodity Classification Number (ECCN) of any goods intended for export. (This information is used to determine export license requirements and to complete the SED/EEI). Penalties, fines and imprisonment can be imposed on non-compliant exporters. For those shipments which contain products subject to export controls, the exporter may be required to submit additional information or documentation and the goods may be subject to examination prior to export. Some of the additional requirements that are encounter include:

  • The Destination Control Statement must be provided on all copies of the waybill, invoice, and export control documents that accompany the shipment to the final end-user.
  • Shipments exported under a Department of State license require that the original license is lodged with Customs and the SED/EEI is authenticated by Customs prior to export. (These shipments are not acceptable on FedEx International Express Services.)
  • International Traffic in Arms (ITAR) to require mandatory electronic filing through the Automated Export System (AES) for exports of U.S. Munitions List (USML) hardware using a U.S. port that require the filing of shipper's export information.
  • There is a mandatory electronic filing via the Automated Export System (AES) of exports of rough diamonds classified under Harmonized Tariff Schedule (HTS) subheadings 7102.10, 7102.21, and 7102.31.
  • Goods subject to Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) control may require an export permit or inspection and exportation is permitted only from certain designated ports. (These shipments are not acceptable for export on FedEx International Express Services.)

Re-Export Requirements

Goods that have been entered into the US on a temporary basis are usually subject to special requirements when the goods are re-exported to another country. (These shipments are not acceptable for export on FedEx International Express Services.)

  • Goods which have been entered duty and/or tax free into a warehouse, Foreign Trade Zone or have been entered under a Temporary importation bond.
  • Goods which are being exported under duty drawback provisions.

Temporary Export Requirements

Goods that are exported with the intention to have them returned may be eligible for duty-free or reduced duty upon re-entry. U.S. exporters may register their goods with U.S. Customs prior to export to ensure that they have satisfactory evidence to present to Customs upon re-entry. However, depending on the circumstances, a declaration from the importer or the foreign shipper may be sufficient. Shipments exported under Carnet require that the original carnet is authenticated by Customs prior to export. The carnet must be authenticated by the foreign Customs officials and presented to U.S. Customs upon re-entry. (Shipments traveling under a Carnet are not acceptable on FedEx International Express Services.)


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United States Export Prohibitions

Export controls imposed on U.S. exporters by the United States government can take the form of prohibitions such as blockades, embargoes, boycotts, and sanctions or they can take the form of limitations which require an export license. Export controls may be product-specific or they can be based on end-use, end-user or ultimate destination. The following is a listing of commodities prohibited or restricted for export from the United States (but cannot be taken as definitive): Prohibited Absolutely The following goods are prohibited by law:

  • Wild animals or birds or their eggs (alive or dead) captured or killed contrary to law
  • Articles containing dog or cat fur
  • The U.S. Fish and Wildlife (FWS) issued a Director's Order announcing it will prohibit the import, export, and sale of elephant ivory, items made of rhinoceros horn, and other products made from protected species listed in the Endangered Species Act (ESA), with a few exceptions. Under this new order, ESA listed species are prohibited without an ESA permit except for those goods that qualify as an antique. Shipments of African elephant ivory, including antiques imported for commercial use are prohibited. In order to qualify as antique, the importer, exporter or seller must provide documentation that the goods are 100 years or older; have not been repaired or modified, were legally imported through an antique port, and were wholly made or containing part of an endgandered species. FWS also required documented proof of the species identification.


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General Export Restrictions

You are prohibited from tendering the following items for shipment to any international destinations unless otherwise indicated, and you agree not to do so. (Additional restrictions may apply depending on destination. Various regulatory clearances in addition to customs clearance may be required for certain commodities, thereby extending the transit time.)

  1. APO/FPO addresses.
  2. C.O.D. shipments.
  3. Human corpses, human organs or body parts, human and animal embryos, or cremated or disinterred human remains.
  4. Explosives (Class 1.4 explosives are acceptable for carriage to Canada, Germany, France, Japan, United Arab Emirates and United Kingdom. Note: United Arab Emirates only allows Class 1.4 explosives to be shipped hold-for-pickup to the FedEx Express facility in Dubai).
  5. Items resembling a bomb, hand grenade or other explosive device, except as provided in the Dangerous Goods section. This includes, but is not limited to, inert products such as novelty items, training aids and works of art.
  6. Firearms, weaponry and their parts (acceptable between the U.S. and Puerto Rico).
  7. Perishable foodstuffs and foods and beverages requiring refrigeration or other environmental control. An exception is available by contract only. Contact your FedEx account executive for information.
  8. Live animals including insects, except as provided in the Live Animals section in the FedEx Service Guide. (Call the FedEx Live Animal Desk at 1.800.405.9052).
  9. Plants and plant material, including cut flowers (cut flowers are acceptable from the U.S. to selected points in Canada and from Colombia, Ecuador and the Netherlands to the U.S.).
  10. Lottery tickets and gambling devices where prohibited by law.
  11. Money (coins, cash, currency, paper money and negotiable instruments equivalent to cash such as endorsed stocks, bonds and cash letters).
  12. Pornographic and/or obscene material.
  13. Shipments being processed under:
    1. Duty drawbacks claims unless advance arrangements are made.
    2. Temporary Import Bonds – acceptable under the FedEx International Broker Select option, for initial import only.
    3. U.S. State Department licenses
    4. Carnets
    5. U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration export permit.
    6. Letters of Credit. Shipments subject to Letters of Credit are generally prohibited, with the exception of shipments subject to Letters of Credit calling for a “courier receipt”, as defined by Article 25 of UCP 600, shipped using the FedEx Expanded Service International Air Waybill.
    7. Certificate of Registration shipments (CF4455).


  14. Hazardous waste, including, but not limited to, used hypodermic needles or syringes transported for sterilization, recycling, disposal or for any other purpose, or other medical waste.
  15. Shipments that may cause damage to, or delay of, equipment, personnel or other shipments.
  16. Shipments that require us to obtain any special licenses or permit for transportation, importation or exportation.
  17. Shipments or commodities whose carriage, importation or exportation is prohibited by any law, statute or regulation.
  18. Counterfeit goods, including, but not limited to, goods under a trademark, without the approval or oversight of the registered trademark owner (also commonly referred to as "fake goods" or "knock-offs").
  19. Marijuana, as defined by U.S. federal law, 21 U.S.C. 802(16), including marijuana intended for recreational or medicinal use, and synthetic cannabinoids.
  20. Shipments with a declared value for customs in excess of that permitted for a specific destination. (See the Declared Value for Carriage and Limits of Liability section in the FedEx Service Guide).
  21. Dangerous goods except as permitted under the Dangerous Goods section of these terms and conditions.
  22. Processed or unprocessed dead animals, including insects and pets. Taxidermy-finished hunting trophies or completely processed (dried) specimens of whole animals or parts of animals are acceptable for shipment into the U.S.
  23. Packages that are wet, leaking or emit an odor of any kind.
  24. Wildlife products that require U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service export clearance by FedEx prior to exportation from the U.S.
  25. In-bond shipments destined to or being withdrawn from a Foreign Trade Zone or bonded warehouse, unless the FedEx International Broker Select option is selected for U.S. import shipments, or the FedEx International Controlled Export service option is selected for U.S. export shipments.
Notwithstanding any other provision of the FedEx Service Guide, we are not liable for delay of, loss of damage to a shipment of any prohibited item. The shipper agrees to indemnity FedEx for any and all costs, fees and expenses FedEx incurs as a result of the shipper's violation of any local, state or federal laws or regulations or from tendering any prohibited item for shipment.

You may be able to ship these items via FedEx International Controlled Export, FedEx International Premium, FedEx International Express Freight (IXF) or FedEx International Airport-to-Airport (ATA). For information on FedEx International Controlled Export, call International Customer Service at 1.800.GoFedEx 1.800.463.3339 (say "international services"). For information on the other services listed call FedEx Express Freight Customer Service at 1.800.332.0807.

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United States Restrictions

Goods Subject to Export Controls

The following goods are restricted by law and may be required to meet special regulatory requirements but are acceptable for exportation on FedEx International Express Services.

  • Goods subject to the EAR (Export Administration Regulations) including, but not limited to; chemicals, microorganisms, electronics, computers, telecommunication and information security devices, lasers and sensors, navigation and avionics, propulsion systems, materials and equipment using nuclear technology, software.
  • Alcohol (Wine)
  • Tobacco, seeds and plants


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Regulatory Contact Information

Branch or Agency Name Areas of Responsibility

Department of the Treasury
Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF
)
605 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Room 809
Washington, DC 20226
Telephone: 202-927-8500

  • Alcoholic beverages
  • Tobacco products
  • Explosives
  • Firearms
  • Ammunitions

US Customs & Border Protection
1300 Pennsylvania Ave.
Washington, DC 20229
Telephone: 202-354-1000

  • Import controls
  • Export controls
  • Smuggling.fraud
  • Collection of Duties

Department of State
Authentications Office

518 23rd St. NW State Annex One
Washington, DC 20520
Telephone: 202-647-5002

  • Authenticates documents that will be used overseas, such as adoption papers, patent applications, etc.

Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs 
301 4th St., SW, Room 247
Washington, DC 20547
Telephone: 202-619-6612
Fax: 202-619-5177

  • Protection of Cultural Property (US and worldwide)

Office of Defense Trade Controls (ODTC) 
PM / DTC, SA-1, 13th Floor
2401 E St., NW
Washington, DC 20520
Telephone: 202-663-2700

  • Import and Export controls on defense articles and services

Department of Transportation (DOT)
400 Seventh St. SW
Washington, DC 20590
Telephone: 202-366-0656

  • Vehicles and parts
  • Safety standards

Department of Health and Human Services
Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
 

5600 Fishers Lane
Rockville, MD 20857
Telephone: 888-463-6332 [U.S. ONLY]

  • Foodstuffs & equipment
  • Pharmaceuticals
  • Cosmetics
  • Medical equipment
  • Laser/radiation devices

Department of Agriculture (USDA)
Jamie L. Whitten Federal Building
12th St. & Jefferson Ave SW
Washington, DC 20250
Telephone: 202-720-3935

  • Agricultural products
  • Livestock & animals
  • Plants & plant products
  • Meat & meat products
  • Seeds

Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) 
1400 Independence Ave., SW
Washington, DC 20250

  • Inspects imports and Exports

Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS)

  • Import of Meat & Poultry Assistance for exporters

Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS)

  • International Food Aid Assistance for exporters

Department of the Interior
Fish & Wildlife Service (FWS), International Affairs 
4401 N. Fairfax Drive
Arlington, VA 22203

  • Import and export of wild plants and animals

Department of Commerce 
1401 Constitution Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20230
Telephone: 202-482-2000

  • Unfair trade practices
    Patents, Trademarks, Product Standards

Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) 
14th St. & Constitution NW
Washington, DC 20230
Telephone: 202-482-4811

  • Export counseling
  • Export Licensing controls

International Trade Administration (ITA) 
1-800-872-8723 [U.S. ONLY]

  • NAFTA Rules of Origin
  • Tariffs and Taxes
  • Market research & statistics

Office of Textiles and Apparel (OTEXA) 
Telephone: 202-482-3400

  • Textile Import Quotas and Trade agreements (AGOA, CBTPA)

Federal Communications Commission (FCC)
445 12th Street SW
Washington, DC 20554
Telephone: 202-418-2555 or [U.S. ONLY]
1-888-225-5322

  • Trade policy
  • Anti-Dumping and Countervailing Duty, Patent & Trademark Investigations

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 
Ariel Rios Building
1200 Pennsylvania Ave N.W.
Washington, DC 20460
Telephone: 202-260-2090

  • Pesticides, insecticides
  • Radioactive substances
  • Paints, dyes, stains
  • Rubber and plastic

AES Direct

  • Electronic Filing of SED

Government Printing Office

  • Publications for purchase
  • On-line: Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) and the Federal Register

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