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Dominican Republic Country Snapshot

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Dominican Republic Domestic Services No

*Availability of particular services may vary by origin and destination. Availability of particular solutions may vary by service selected. All services subject to the applicable FedEx Service Guide.
Country Information

Capital: Santo Domingo (de Guzman)
Population: 9,823,821 est.
Language: Spanish
Weights and Measures: Metric
Currency: Dominican Peso (RD$); 1 Peso = 100 Centavos
Time Zone Operates on Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) 
Dominican Republic GMT - 4

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Trade Group Member

Preferential Trade Agreements Caribbean Basin Trade Partnership Agreement

Non-reciprocal trade agreement signed in 1983 between 24 developing countries; Antigua and Barbuda, Aruba, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, British Virgin Islands, Costa Rica, Dominica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Montserrat, Netherlands Antilles, Nicaragua, Panama, St. Christopher and Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Trinidad and the United States. The agreement is in effect until September 30, 2008.The CBTPA allows a great variety of goods to enter the United States market free of taxes and duties. The list of non-eligible products includes: textiles and clothing, canned tuna, certain watches and watch parts, petroleum and petroleum by products as well as some leather items such as luggage, handbags, footwear and work gloves.

Cotonou Agreement

After 25 years of being the largest aid and trade agreement between developed and developing countries, the Lomé Convention expired in February 2000. A new, more ambitious, 20-year 'Partnership Agreement' was signed in Benin on 23 June, between the European Community and 77 countries from Africa, the Caribbean and the Pacific.

This non-reciprocal financial and technical cooperation agreement provides emergency assistance and a preferential trade system. The accord seeks to promote and accelerate economic, cultural and social development in the ACP countries via several methods of collaboration and the elimination of taxes and quantitative limitations for a number of products entering the EU countries. Certain rules of origin apply. The Dominican Republic is a participating member to this agreement.

Central American Free Trade Agreement

On 16 April 1998, the Presidents of Costa Rica, El Salvador, Honduras and Nicaragua, and the Minister of Economy of Guatemala, representing the President of Guatemala, signed with the President of the Dominican Republic, the Central American Free Trade Agreement with the Dominican Republic. This treaty covers the trade of goods, services and investments. It is a modern treaty, following the guidelines of the World Trade Organization and in line with the creation of the Free Trade Area of the Americas. In addition to it being advanced and complete, it has the peculiarity of granting reciprocal immediate trade opening for a tariff universe, with the exception of a limited list of products. The members are; the Dominican Republic, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and the United States.

Under the terms of the Protocol, 19 products will be broadly exempted from tariff reform, including petroleum derivatives, tobacco, cigars and cigarettes made from blond leaf, sugar made from cane or beets, roasted and un-roasted coffee, wheat flour, ethyl alcohol, alcoholic beverages, malts, rice, poultry, milk, onions, garlic, beans and cotton textiles. Tariffs will be gradually lowered until the year 2004 on bovine and porcine meats, processed tomatoes, hygienic paper, napkins, polyethylene and polypropylene bags, oral and intravenous sera, plastic films made of ethylene polymers, shrimps and lobsters. Tariff quotas within which products will be given favorable tariff treatment apply to chicken breasts, oils, margarine and milk.

CARICOM Free Trade Agreement

The 16 member Caribbean Community (CARICOM) including Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Montserrat, St. Vincent and Grenada, Suriname, St. Lucia, St. Kitts and Nevis, Trinidad and Tobago, and their associate members; Anguilla, Bermuda, the British Virgin Islands, the Cayman Islands, and the Turks and Caicos Islands have a Trade Agreement with the Dominican Republic. This free trade accord is expected to eventually remove most tariffs between the Carribean Coummunity.

Generalized System of Preferences (GSP)

This trade scheme is implemented by several developed countries, as well as by the US, allowing the partial or full reduction of import tariffs. These preferences are not reciprocal.

The GSP covers 16 different preferential schemes applied by 34 countries. These countries are: Australia, Canada, Japan, New Zealand, Norway, the United States, Switzerland, Bulgaria, Russia and the EU.

For instance, the GSP gives the Dominican Republic duty-free access to US markets for manufactured and semi-manufactured products. There are about 3,000 items that can be exported to the US under the GSP, so long as they have increased in value by 35% as a result of processing in the Dominican Republic and are imported directly to the United States.

Multilateral organizations:

Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA)

The Free Trade Area of the Americas is an evolving blueprint for the trade area that encompass Canada, North America and all other democratic countries of South and central America and the Caribbean. Its goal is to expand growth and opportunities for all members by lowering tariffs and coordinating national testing and administrative systems that block trade.

World Trade Organization (WTO)

Established in 1995, the WTO has a membership of over 140 countries. It is the only global international organization dealing with the rules of trade between nations. At its heart are the WTO agreements, negotiated and signed by the bulk of the world's trading nations and ratified in their parliaments. The goal is to help producers of goods and services, exporters and importers conduct their business.

Environmental agreements

Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna

Cites entered into force on 1975 and now has a membership of 152 countries. These countries act by banning commercial international trade in an agreed list of endangered species and by regulating and monitoring trade in others that might become endangered.

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General Import Clearance Information

Customs Number

FedEx Clearance

Working with Customs officials throughout the world, FedEx has developed innovative technology to eliminate many steps of the paperwork-handling process and expedite the movement of international shipments. An example in China is the FedEx Expressclear Electronic Customs clearance system. Starting at the origin location, state-of-the-art technology allows the processing of shipment paperwork and electronic transmission of documents to the designated FedEx hub and destination clearance location. The Expressclear system also keeps a database of regulatory information, which includes; importers' numbers, broker designations, corporate contact names and telephone numbers. At a FedEx hub, international shipments are sorted, scanned and loaded onto an international flight. Vital shipment information is keyed into a worldwide manifest database, which is linked into computer systems operated by brokers and Customs officials in many countries. Even before the plane has taken off, or while it is in the air, Customs agents and brokers at the destination airport of entry can begin examining shipping manifests, querying air waybill data if they need more details, assessing duties and taxes a selecting the shipments they wish to examine. By the time the plane arrives at its destination, many packages have already been cleared by Customs. As the plane is unloaded, the Expressclear system identifies packages to be examined and prints "cleared" Customs labels for all others. Cleared shipments are transferred to trucks for immediate delivery. International shipments are scanned at all key points throughout the process, and this allows for up-to-date status reports including when Customs clearance is obtained.

Tariff classification:

As a member of the WTO the Dominican Republic uses the HS system of Tariff Classification.

Expedited Clearance

Customs does offer two methods of expedited clearance:

Advance Declaration (Declaracion Anticipada) - Importers may submit customs documentation 25 days prior to the arrival of the shipment.

Express Dispatch (Despacho Expresso) - This mode includes advance declaration of the goods and the verification of the shipment by customs officials at the importer's warehouse

Document Requirements Air waybill and Commercial Invoice

All FedEx shipments require an international air waybill and with limited exception, a commercial invoice. The value on the commercial invoice must be declared in $USD for all shipments. TAX ID Number (RNC) The importers tax id; Registro Nacional de Contribuyentes ( RNC), number must be listed on the documents for all shipments.

Import Licenses

Import licenses are not required for most products, except pharmaceutical products (drugs, cosmetics and skin care products) and agro-chemicals. For pharmaceutical products a license must be obtained at the Secretariat of State for Public Health for each trademark/product imported by the company. The license is valid for a period of five years. Agro-chemicals and fertilizers require an import license from the Secretariat of State for Agriculture.

Agriculture

"No objection" and other type of permits are often required to import agricultural commodities into the Dominican Republic. Phytosanitary certificates issued by recognized authorities in the country of origin must accompany live plants and agricultural material used in planting. Imports of animals normally require certificates of origin and other veterinarian documentation to assure disease-free-status. Testing is done at the port of entry to reconfirm pest free status. Tariff rate quotas were proposed for eight agricultural goods (rice, sugar, chicken parts, pork, corn, onions, milk powder and garlic). Imports of food and agricultural products are normally facilitated through local distributors.

Phytosanitary Certificates

Phytosanitary certificates issued by recognized authorities in the country of origin must accompany live plants and agricultural material used in planting. Phytosanitary certificates for exporting are issued by the Secretaria de Estado de Salud Publica y Assist. Soc.

Certificates of Origin

Certificates of Origin are required for certain commodities under preferential trade agreements, for example; CARICOM trade preferences. They are also, required for the importing of animals and some animal products.

Veterinarian documentation

Animal and Animal products in most cases require veterinary certificates and other sanitary documents providing proof of pest free status. These commodities are also highly subject to delays in clearance processing due to possible testing at ports of entry.  

Customs Valuation

The Customs office of the Dominican Republic now uses the GATT rules of valuation; which is the Value of the goods including Insurance and Freight (CIF) that is listed on the commercial invoice. This valuation rule is only applied to shipments imported from countries belonging to the WTO.

For imports from countries that are not members of the WTO, the valuation will continue to be done by valuation lists created by the Customs Authorities of the Dominican Republic.  

Import Duties

Taxes and duties for imported goods (agricultural and nonagricultural) are calculated upon the "ad-valorem price" i.e. CIF price of the invoice multiplied by the unified foreign exchange rate. All Duties and taxes are collected in Dominican Pesos. There are generally four taxes on imports except for those subject to exemptions provided by law:

  1. Tariff (Arancel): This is the basic import duty  which ranges from 0 to 20%.
  2. Luxury Tax (Impuesto Selectivo al Consumo): this is a consumption tax for luxury imports or "non-essential" goods that can be from 15 to 60 % of the CIF value.
  3. Exchange Surcharge (Recargo Cambiario): This is a five percent tax imposed to all imports into the Dominican Republic.
  4. Industrialized Goods and Services Tax (ITBS-Impuesto de Transferencia a los Bienes Industrializados y Servicios): This is a 12 % tax on processed agricultural goods and all non-agricultural goods. ITBIS is calculated on the CIF price plus the amount paid for all other taxes and duties

Antidumping

The Dominican Republic does observe the GATT rules under article VI with reference to antidumping measures as well as the WTO standards for complying with these measures.

Excise Duties

The Dominican Republic does not charge excise taxes however they do charge and industrial services taxes and luxury taxes for non-essential luxury goods.

Additional Duties

The Customs authorities of the Dominican Republic charge no additional duties beyond the basic duty regime (Arancel) although they do charge other taxes and customs fees.

Import Taxes

Luxury Tax 

(Impuesto Selectivo al Consumo): this is a consumption tax for luxury imports or "non-essential" goods that can be from 15 to 60 % of the CIF value.

Industrialized Goods and Services Tax (ITBS-Impuesto de Transferencia a los Bienes Industrializados y Servicios): This is a 12 % tax on processed agricultural goods and all non-agricultural goods. ITBIS is calculated on the CIF price plus the amount paid for all other taxes and duties.

Customs Fees

Exchange Surcharge 

(Recargo Cambiario): This is a five percent tax imposed to all imports into the Dominican Republic.

Exchange Controls

A new exchange rate system now enables importers to obtain hard currency directly from commercial banks instead of the central bank. The central bank charges a two percent commission on costs (pesos) in the free market. The central bank and the commercial banks compete for foreign exchange (U.S. dollars tourism, remittances for Dominicans living abroad and free trade zone (FTZ) expenditures). The central bank has the monopoly in collecting U.S. dollars coming from non-FTZ exports. The exchange rates from the central bank and commercial banks have been competitive since the new free foreign exchange systems have been in effect. The result has been the availability of hard currency to pay for imports, and to remit profits.

Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT's)

The Dominican Republic does use discretionary licenses to provide local produce protection from outside competition. There are also tariff rate quotas for rice, sugar, garlic, poultry meat, beans, onions, and milk.  

Consular Fees

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Dominican Republic Import Prohibitions

Prohibited goods

There are no legal prohibitions to imports although discretionary import licenses continue to be required from the Secretariat of Agriculture for most agricultural products. These serve to limit imports of many items, which are perceived as competing with domestic production.

Dangerous Goods as defined by IATA (Intl. Air Transport Association)  

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General Import Restrictions

The following items are not acceptable for carriage to any international destinations unless otherwise indicated. (Additional restrictions may apply depending on destination. Various regulatory clearances in addition to customs clearance may be required for certain commodities, thereby extending the transit time.)

  1. APO/FPO addresses.
  2. C.O.D. shipments.
  3. Human corpses, human organs or body parts, human and animal embryos, or cremated or disinterred human remains.
  4. Explosives (Class 1.4 explosives are acceptable for carriage to Canada, Germany, France, Japan, United Arab Emirates and United Kingdom. Note: United Arab Emirates only allows Class 1.4 explosives to be shipped hold-for-pickup to the FedEx Express facility in Dubai).
  5. Firearms, weaponry and their parts (acceptable between the U.S. and Puerto Rico).
  6. Perishable foodstuffs and foods and beverages requiring refrigeration or other environmental control.
  7. Live animals including insects, except as provided in the Live Animals section in the FedEx Service Guide. (Call the FedEx Live Animal Desk at 1.800.405.9052).
  8. Plants and plant material, including cut flowers (cut flowers are acceptable from the U.S. to selected points in Canada and from Colombia, Ecuador and the Netherlands to the U.S.).
  9. Lottery tickets and gambling devices where prohibited by law.
  10. Money (coins, cash, currency, paper money and negotiable instruments equivalent to cash such as endorsed stocks, bonds and cash letters).
  11. Pornographic and/or obscene material.
  12. Shipments being processed under:
    1. Duty drawbacks claims unless advance arrangements are made.
    2. Temporary Import Bonds – acceptable under the FedEx International Broker Select option, for initial import only.
    3. U.S. State Department licenses
    4. Carnets
    5. U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration export permit.
    6. Letters of Credit. Shipments subject to Letters of Credit are generally prohibited, with the exception of shipments subject to Letters of Credit calling for a “courier receipt”, as defined by Article 25 of UCP 600, shipped using the FedEx Expanded Service International Air Waybill.
    7. Certificate of Registration shipments (CF4455).

    You may be able to ship these items via FedEx International Controlled Export, FedEx International Premium, FedEx International Express Freight (IXF) or FedEx International Airpot-to-Airport (ATA). For information on FedEx International Controlled Export, call International Customer Service at 1.800.GoFedEx 1.800.463.3339 (say “international services’). For information on the other services listed call FedEx Express Freight Customer Service at 1.800.332.0807.
  13. Hazardous waste, including, but not limited to, used hypodermic needles or syringes or other medial waste.
  14. Shipments that may cause damage to, or delay of, equipment, personnel or other shipments.
  15. Shipments that require us to obtain any special licenses or permit for transportation, importation or exportation.
  16. Shipments or commodities whose carriage, importation or exportation is prohibited by any law, statute or regulation.
  17. Shipments with a declared value for customs in excess of that permitted for a specific destination. (See the Declared Value for Carriage and Limits of Liability section in the FedEx Service Guide).
  18. Dangerous goods except as permitted under the Dangerous Goods section of these terms and conditions.
  19. Processed or unprocessed dead animals, including insects and pets. Taxidermy-finished hunting trophies or completely processed (dried) specimens of whole animals or parts of animals are acceptable for shipment into the U.S.
  20. Packages that are wet, leaking or emit an odor of any kind.
  21. Wildlife products that require U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service export clearance by FedEx prior to exportation from the U.S.
  22. In-bond shipments destined to or being withdrawn from a Foreign Trade Zone or bonded warehouse, unless the FedEx International Broker Select option is selected for U.S. import shipments, or the FedEx International Controlled Export service option is selected for U.S. export shipments.

Not withstanding any other provision of the FedEx Service Guide, we are not liable for delay of, loss of damage to a shipment of any prohibited item. The shipper agrees to indemnity FedEx for any and all costs, fees and expenses FedEx incurs as a result of the shipper’s violation of any local, state or federal laws or regulations or from tendering any prohibited item for shipment.

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Dominican Republic Restrictions

Discretionary import licenses continue to be required from the Secretariat of Agriculture for most agricultural products. These serve to limit imports of many items, which are perceived as competing with domestic production. 

Registration requirements

"There are special restrictions and controls for live animals and unpacked foods as well as medicines and products designed to enter the health market. These special rules, however, are more in the area of registration and prior import license approval than in marking and labeling requirements.

Intellectual Property                                                                                   

The Dominican Republic is a signatory to most of the international treaties and conventions protecting copyrights and other intellectual property, including the Universal Copyright Convention, which was ratified in 1992 and grants reciprocal protection under its treaty obligations to eligible nationals and foreigners. Its own intellectual property law closely parallels existing legislation in other countries.

Ports of entry

There are restrictions on the entry of various goods through specific ports. This may be an obstacle for some methods of importing into certain cities. Some examples of restricted goods are:

Jewelry; only costume jewelry can be cleared through Santo Domingo

The following commodities are prohibited via FedEx International Priority (IP) services into the Dominican Republic: (However, you may be able to use another FedEx service for shipping these items. For additional shipping options, please contact your local FedEx customer service representative)

Dangerous Goods as defined by IATA                                                                                                                                                                                                  Seeds
Soil


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Special Import Provisions

Temporary Entry (TIB)

Temporary entry is permitted for exhibition or demonstration purposes. Also for equipment needed for a temporary work in the D.R. Temporary entry of goods was adopted by Customs as a business facilitation service. No customs duties are paid to customs and the goods must be returned. A bond, however, or other suitable security for all or a portion of the value of the goods must be posted at the time of temporary entry. This will be returned upon meeting all the terms of temporary entry and proof of shipment out of the country. If the company wishes to sell the products or machinery after making temporary entry, valuation and all relevant duties are determined in accordance with previously noted customs procedures. Temporary entry admittance is granted for a period of three (3) months. If more time is needed a renewal is required at the end of the three months. Although FedEx does not process these types of entries under FedEx International Priority Service they can be sent FedEx via International Priority Broker Selection Option.

Free Zones/Warehouses (FTZ)

One of the few areas of economic activity in which tax incentives are still available, the industrial free zones of the country are covered by Law N° 8-9. Under this legislation, companies that operate in an approved free zone park are exempt from all corporate income taxes, including capitalization taxes; all import duties on their raw materials and may repatriate 100% of their after-tax profits. The rules stated in the free zone legislation clear-cut and have been in operation for a long period of time.

All shipments destined for a Free Zone (Zona Franca) must have a type written air waybill. Hand written air waybills are prohibited.

Free Zone Operators (FZO) and enterprises are entitled to 100 percent exemption for extended periods of time from:

  • Payment of import duties and related taxes on a raw materials, equipment, construction materials, parts of buildings, office equipment, etc. destined for construction, preparation or operation within the free trade zone.
  • All taxes or duties on exports or re-exports which enter into the local market.
  • The business tax (patente) on inventory or assets and from the tax on the transfer of industrialized goods and services (ITBIS).
  • Consular charges on imports consigned to Free Zone operators or enterprises.

Personal Effects

Are acceptable for import into the Dominican Republic but are subject to normal duties and taxes. Delays in the clearance processing time can be expected.

Samples

There are no special provisions for entry of samples.


Gifts

Gifts up to $50 USD in value are able to clear customs duty and tax free with the exception of any electronic items.


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Standards

The Dominican Republic has formally subscribed to ISO 9000 and has announced its intention to follow all subsequent ISO 9000 standards. Products meeting WTO standards of labeling and marking should have little difficulty in complying with relevant Dominican regulations. It is also a member of COPAN; the Pan-American Convention on Norms and Standards. DIGENOR (Direccion General de Normas y Sistemas de Calidad), is the government office in charge of enforcement of regulations on marking, labeling as well as quality controls.

Labeling/Marking

Consumer goods must be marked with the country of manufacture prior to sale. Packaged goods must also indicate the quality or purity, the ingredients, and the net weight or measure of the contents.

Effective March 1, 2002, DIGENOR has begun to enforce labeling requirements for canned or packaged foodstuffs imported into the Dominican Republic; labeling must be in Spanish for all ingredients, including additives, manufacturing and expiration dates of the products, and the name of the producer or importer. All sizes and weights of the net contents also must be converted to the metric system. Goods not complying with these requirements may be imported but not sold to consumers until conversion is made. Thus, foodstuffs labeled in English have to be re-labeled in the Dominican Republic before they can be sold.


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General Export Clearance Information

Clearance Process

A requirement for export licenses for most agricultural exports was lifted in 1993. The exchange rate applied to traditional exports was unified at the current official exchange rate. Currently, the Dominican Center for Export Promotion (CEDOPEX) implemented the use of a form to declare exports. According to CEDOPEX it trusts the quantity and the price exporters declare. Export values are reported in US dollars. In the even the transaction is in any other currency (including RD$) the US$ value is estimated at the official exchange rate

Document Requirements

No export licenses are required. However, a sworn declaration of exports (Declaracion Jurada de Exportacion or Formulario Unico de Exportacion) should be presented at the port of departure. Free zone companies need only submit certifications from the National Free Zone Council to CEDOPEX (a government organization) to declare and register exports.

General Export Clearance Information


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Dominican Republic Export Prohibitions

The following commodities are prohibited via FedEx International Priority (IP)services out of the Dominican Republic:

Dangerous Goods as defined by IATA


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General Export Restrictions

The following items are not acceptable for carriage to any international destinations unless otherwise indicated. (Additional restrictions may apply depending on destination. Various regulatory clearances in addition to customs clearance may be required for certain commodities, thereby extending the transit time.)

  1. APO/FPO addresses.
  2. C.O.D. shipments.
  3. Human corpses, human organs or body parts, human and animal embryos, or cremated or disinterred human remains.
  4. Explosives (Class 1.4 explosives are acceptable for carriage to Canada, Germany, France, Japan, United Arab Emirates and United Kingdom. Note: United Arab Emirates only allows Class 1.4 explosives to be shipped hold-for-pickup to the FedEx Express facility in Dubai).
  5. Firearms, weaponry and their parts (acceptable between the U.S. and Puerto Rico).
  6. Perishable foodstuffs and foods and beverages requiring refrigeration or other environmental control.
  7. Live animals including insects, except as provided in the Live Animals section in the FedEx Service Guide. (Call the FedEx Live Animal Desk at 1.800.405.9052).
  8. Plants and plant material, including cut flowers (cut flowers are acceptable from the U.S. to selected points in Canada and from Colombia, Ecuador and the Netherlands to the U.S.).
  9. Lottery tickets and gambling devices where prohibited by law.
  10. Money (coins, cash, currency, paper money and negotiable instruments equivalent to cash such as endorsed stocks, bonds and cash letters).
  11. Pornographic and/or obscene material.
  12. Shipments being processed under:
    1. Duty drawbacks claims unless advance arrangements are made.
    2. Temporary Import Bonds – acceptable under the FedEx International Broker Select option, for initial import only.
    3. U.S. State Department licenses
    4. Carnets
    5. U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration export permit.
    6. Letters of Credit. Shipments subject to Letters of Credit are generally prohibited, with the exception of shipments subject to Letters of Credit calling for a “courier receipt”, as defined by Article 25 of UCP 600, shipped using the FedEx Expanded Service International Air Waybill.
    7. Certificate of Registration shipments (CF4455).

    You may be able to ship these items via FedEx International Controlled Export, FedEx International Premium, FedEx International Express Freight (IXF) or FedEx International Airpot-to-Airport (ATA). For information on FedEx International Controlled Export, call International Customer Service at 1.800.GoFedEx 1.800.463.3339 (say “international services’). For information on the other services listed call FedEx Express Freight Customer Service at 1.800.332.0807.
  13. Hazardous waste, including, but not limited to, used hypodermic needles or syringes or other medial waste.
  14. Shipments that may cause damage to, or delay of, equipment, personnel or other shipments.
  15. Shipments that require us to obtain any special licenses or permit for transportation, importation or exportation.
  16. Shipments or commodities whose carriage, importation or exportation is prohibited by any law, statute or regulation.
  17. Shipments with a declared value for customs in excess of that permitted for a specific destination. (See the Declared Value for Carriage and Limits of Liability section in the FedEx Service Guide).
  18. Dangerous goods except as permitted under the Dangerous Goods section of these terms and conditions.
  19. Processed or unprocessed dead animals, including insects and pets. Taxidermy-finished hunting trophies or completely processed (dried) specimens of whole animals or parts of animals are acceptable for shipment into the U.S.
  20. Packages that are wet, leaking or emit an odor of any kind.
  21. Wildlife products that require U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service export clearance by FedEx prior to exportation from the U.S.
  22. In-bond shipments destined to or being withdrawn from a Foreign Trade Zone or bonded warehouse, unless the FedEx International Broker Select option is selected for U.S. import shipments, or the FedEx International Controlled Export service option is selected for U.S. export shipments.

Not withstanding any other provision of the FedEx Service Guide, we are not liable for delay of, loss of damage to a shipment of any prohibited item. The shipper agrees to indemnity FedEx for any and all costs, fees and expenses FedEx incurs as a result of the shipper’s violation of any local, state or federal laws or regulations or from tendering any prohibited item for shipment.


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Germany Restrictions

There are no real export restrictions for exporting from the Dominican Republic.

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Regulatory Contact Information

Branch or Agency Name Areas of Responsibility

DIRECCION GENERAL DE ADUANAS
Calle Mexico
Santo Domingo
Phone:(809) 688-7070
Fax: (809) 221-3255

DIRECTORATE GENERAL OF CUSTOMS
Customs regulates and assesses all duties and taxes. Administers and controls all imports and exports.

Secretaria de Estado de Industria y Comercio
Ave. Mexico, Edificio de Oficinas Gubernamentales
Juan Pablo Duarte, Piso 7
Santo Domingo, Dom. Rep.

Secretariat of State for Industry and Commerce
This agency regulates trade and industry standards for energy, and combustibles. It also heads the sub-agency DIGENOR which regulates standards for intellectual property, Copyright, marking and labeling (NORMAS).

  • Copyright
  • Intellectual property rights
  • Standards
  • Normas

ecretaria de Estado de Agricultura
Ing. Agrom Eligio Jaquez,
Kilómetro 6 ½ Autopista Duarte
Santo Domingo, Dom. Rep..

Secretariat of State for Agriculture
This agency regulates all agricultural, forestry, environmental, animal, and fisheries imports and exports. Also, monitors import quotas for agricultural and food products. They issue all agricultural licenses, permits and quota registry numbers.

  • Phytosanitary certificates and inspection
  • Veterinary Certificates and inspection
  • Agricultural Licenses, permits and registry
  • CITES

Secretaria de Estado de Salud Publica y Asist. Soc.
Av. Tiradentes, esq.
San Cristobal
Santo Domingo

Secretariat of State for Health
This agency handles controls and issues licenses and permits for foods, cosmetics and medications.

  • Prescription and non prescription drugs
  • Cosmetics
  • Foods

Direccion Nacional de Control de Drogas
Av. Máximo Gómez # 70, La Esperilla, Santo Domingo,
República Dominicana,

National Directorate for the Control of Drugs
This agency handles the controls in place for all illicit drugs and chemicals made to produce illegal drugs and substances.

  • Narcotics
  • Chemical Precursors
  • Illegal substances
  • Import and export

Instituto Dominicano de las Telecomunicaciones (INDOTEL)
Abraham Lincoln #962
Santo Domingo, República Dominicana
Tel. 732-5555
Fax. 732-3904

Dominican Republic Institute for Telecommunications
This agency regulates the import of all telecommunications equipment and parts, including radio and television broadcast and reception goods.

  • Import Licenses for telecommunications and radio and broadcast commodities.
  • Prior import approval of telecommunications equipment.

Secretaria de Estado de Relaciones Exteriores (SEREX)
Av. Independencia No. 752
Santo Domingo; República Dominicana
Tel: (809) 535-6280
Fax: (809) 533-5772

Secretariat of State for Foreign Relations
This agency administers consular services, cultural services, and foreign relations information.

  • Consular Invoices
  • Consular Services
  • Other documentation (visas, passports etc)
Centro Dominicano de Promocion Exportatciones (CEDOPEX)
Plaza de la Bandera
Av. 27 de Febrero, Plaza de la Independencia
Santo Domingo, R. D.
Tel: (809) 530-5505
Fax: (809) 530-8208

Dominican Republic Center for Export Promotions
This agency administers export documents and exports an export registry. It also, assists with export promotions and statistics.

  • Export Declarations
  • Export registry
  • Export controls
  • Export promotion

Banco de Central de la Republica Dominicana
Calle Pedro Henríquez Ureña esq. Leopoldo Navarro
Santo Domingo,
República Dominicana
Tel: (809) 221-9111
Fax: (809) 686-7488

Central Bank of the Dominican Republic
This agency regulates all imports of items with a monetary value including but not limited to:

  • Letters of Credit
  • Currency and coins
  • Bonds and Stocks
  • Jewelry, Precious Metals and Stones
  • Deeds of Trust and Mortgage
  • Documents
  • Stamps

 

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