Chile Country Snapshot

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Chile Domestic Services No

*Services may not be available to every city.  Solutions may not be available with every FedEx service.  Please reference the FedEx Service Guide for more information.

Country Information

Capital: Santiago
Population: 16,746,491 est.
Language: Spanish
Weights and Measures: Metric
Currency:

Chilean peso (CLP)

Time Zone Operates on Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) 
Chile GMT - 4

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Trade Group Member

APEC, the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation, promotes trade among the Pacific Rim members (Australia; Brunei Darussalam; Canada; Chile; People's Republic of China; Hong Kong, China; Indonesia; Japan; Republic of Korea; Malaysia; Mexico; New Zealand; Papua New Guinea; Peru; Republic of the Philippines; Russia; Singapore; Chinese Taipei; Thailand; USA; Vietnam).

CITES, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of wild fauna and flora provides for the seizure of shipments prohibited under this agreement and the assessment of fines.

Chile is a party to various international agreements related to the environment and natural conservation including agreements on Climate Change, Hazardous Wastes, and Ozone Layer Protection.

WTO, the World Trade Organization is the successor to GATT (General Agreement on Tariff and Trade) and oversees the negotiation and arbitration of many international trade agreements. (Numerous bilateral and multilateral agreements such as the Agreement on Textiles and Clothing are grouped under the umbrella of the WTO.)

MFN or Most Favored Nation tariff treatment is accorded to all countries which have ratified the WTO as well as to the other previous GATT members who have yet to ratify the accord.

Chile has Free Trade Agreements with Canada, Mexico, European Union countries and U.S. that are similar to NAFTA. The agreements provide for the elimination or progressive reduction of tariffs between the Canada and Chile and between Mexico and Chile. The exemption or reduced tariff is applicable only to goods qualified under the agreement as originating goods.

Chile is a member of the Latin America Integration Association (LAIA/ALADI) and has trade agreements with fellow members including Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Venezuela and the Mercosur countries.

Chile is an associate member of Mercosur, which provides for the reduction of tariffs between Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Paraguay and Uruguay for eligible goods that qualify under strict rules of origin.

Chile, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua have signed a Free Trade Agreement which encourages the free trade of goods and services and multilateral investments.

Chile participates in the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA) process, which is attempting to integrate the economies of the Western Hemisphere into a single free trade arrangement.

Chile is a member of the Organization of American States, which promotes the welfare of its people by encouraging democracy, free trade and peace in the hemisphere.

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General Import Clearance Information

Clearance Process

Chile has adopted the Harmonized System (HS) and requires that a full and complete description be provided for all shipments entering the country.  The description must include the value of each commodity.  (Shipments which arrive without an accurate description and value may be seized by Customs.)  If possible, the HS# should also be provided. If the commercial invoice does not breakout the value and quantity of each commodity, a packing list should be provided.  In some cases, the exporter will need to provide a certificate of origin and/or a Phytosanitary certificate.  Customs entries are generally submitted by a customs broker, either electronically or by submitting copies of the required documents (Individuals who import non-commercial goods valued less than US$500 can handle customs entry without using a customs broker.)  When they have all the information necessary for customs entry, brokers can use the Advanced Customs Procedure in which the entry is submitted prior to physically submitting the goods for any required inspection, treatment, etc. (Some goods require inspection or testing before Customs will permit entry.)  Chilean Customs provides a list of customs brokers on their website and information on their responsibilities to their clients and to the government.

Document Requirements

Commercial forms used by both local importers and exporters are:  commercial invoice, certificate of origin, bill of lading, freight insurance and packing list. All non document shipments require an orginal numbered Commercial Invoice.  The Commercial Invoice must be on company letterhead with an itemized list of contents, true FOB value and be signed or stamped by the shipper. Consignee's tax ID number should be on Air Waybill and Commercial Invoice.  A passport number is acceptable for non Chilean residents.   Pro Forma invoices are acceptable as exceptions by Chilean Customs as valid documents for clearance.  A minimum value of $1.00 USD must be on all non document shipments.    Import Licenses - all imports require a license, but, according to legislation governing the Central Bank since 1990, import licenses are granted as a routine procedure for nearly all goods.  Licensing requirements are maintained largely as a statistical gathering mechanism, not as a control.  More rigorous licensing procedures apply for pharmaceuticals and weapons.

Customs Valuation

Chilean customs valuation uses the normal value of merchandise, without special discounts, plus freight and insurance (CIF).  Used goods are valued by the customs service according to the current new value of similar merchandise, discounting 10% per year of use, up to a 70% discount.

Import Duties

Imports are subject to duties and taxes which must be paid before customs will release goods.  An "ad valorem" customs duty (a percentage of the CIF value of the goods) is imposed on most goods and "specific" duties (based on the quantity) on certain goods.  (The "specific" duties have been as high as 30%)  The uniform "ad valorem" tariff of 6% applies to most goods.

Antidumping

Trade laws also allow Customs to assess antidumping duties or countervailing duties. Antidumping duties are assessed on imported merchandise that is sold in Chile at less than the normal price of the good in the manufacturer's home market (also called the Fair Market Value). Countervailing duties are assessed to counter the effects of subsidies provided by a foreign government for merchandise exported to Chile resulting in artificially low prices that are detrimental to Chilean industries.

Excise Duties

Alcoholic beverages and tobacco products are subject other taxes.  A surcharge may be assessed on used goods.   The new law establishes an ad valorem tax rate of 27% for all liquor.

Additional Duties

Imported automobiles are also subject to luxury tax (85 percent on the value above $15,000, which is adjusted annually for U.S. inflation) and engine size (a sliding scale -- this is being phased out).  Duties on capital goods purchased for use in export production may be deferred for a period of seven years and waived under some circumstances. Exceptions to the standard tariff and tax policies are:  certain agricultural products, luxury goods, computers, and software.  Such commodities as sugar, wheat, edible oils, wheat flour, are subject to a price band to protect local producers.  The price band results in raises the effective tax rates on these imports to 34% or more. Luxury goods are affected by substantial domestic excise taxes ranging from 30 to 70%, viz, liquor, articles of gold, platinum and ivory, furs, high quality rugs, yachts, beer, wine, whiskey, mineral water, cigarettes. Software:  to take advantage of special terms of the Uruguay Round, the actual software programs on magnetic media and the accompanying manuals are imported separately.  Thus 90% of the value of  the software exported is declared as technical printed matter, and as such is not subject to Chile's import duty.  The balance 9% is declared magnetic media and subject to the current 6% import duty. Computers enter Chile duty-free as a result of the Information Technology Agreement.

Import Taxes

An IVA (Impuesto al Valor Agregado = Value Added Tax) tax of 19% is assessed on the value of the imported goods plus the amount of customs duty.

Customs Fees

There are no customs fees.

Exchange Controls

Money exchange operations in Chile are particularly efficient and active by Latin American standards. As a general rule, currency may be freely traded in two markets; the formal and informal or inter-bank market. The Central Bank is empowered to require that certain transactions be executed only through the formal market, such as those related to the import or export of goods and services, foreign loans, capital flows and profit remittances. It may also determine that certain operations be subject to prior approval as in the case of foreign loans and investments, repatriation, hedging and other future market operations. The exchange rate is allowed to float within 5% band on either side of an agreed rate (dolar acuerdo) that is adjusted to compensate for differences between Chilean inflation and that of its trading partners. The band allows for significant fluctuation in the real value of the peso.

Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT's)

Technical barriers or non-tariff barriers to trade as they are sometimes known, can cause many problems for exporters looking for new markets for their products. These barriers can be in the form of regulations, standards, testing and certification procedures. The World Trade Organization (WTO) Agreement on Technical Barriers to Trade tries to ensure that these barriers do not create unnecessary obstacles. To obtain further information on Technical Barriers to Trade as well as Notifications on technical regulations and conformity assessment procedures, go to the WTO website at http://www.wto.org/english/tratop_e/tbt_e/tbt_e.htm

Consular Fees

Legalization of shipping documents is generally not required as a condition of entry of goods into Chile.

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Chile Import Prohibitions

The following commodities are prohibited into Chile:

  • Used passenger and cargo vehicles for tourism
  • Used tires
  • Used motorcycles
  • Asbestos in any form or incorporated into other products
  • Narcotics
  • Knives (except for cutlery)
  • Dangerous Goods as defined by IATA (Intl. Air Transport Association)

 

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General Import Restrictions

You are prohibited from tendering the following items for shipment to any international destinations unless otherwise indicated, and you agree not to do so. (Additional restrictions may apply depending on destination. Various regulatory clearances in addition to customs clearance may be required for certain commodities, thereby extending the transit time.)

  1. APO/FPO addresses.
  2. C.O.D. shipments.
  3. Human corpses, human organs or body parts, human and animal embryos, or cremated or disinterred human remains.
  4. Explosives (Class 1.4 explosives are acceptable for carriage to Canada, Germany, France, Japan, United Arab Emirates and United Kingdom. Note: United Arab Emirates only allows Class 1.4 explosives to be shipped hold-for-pickup to the FedEx Express facility in Dubai).
  5. Items resembling a bomb, hand grenade or other explosive device, except as provided in the Dangerous Goods section. This includes, but is not limited to, inert products such as novelty items, training aids and works of art.
  6. Firearms, weaponry and their parts (acceptable between the U.S. and Puerto Rico).
  7. Perishable foodstuffs and foods and beverages requiring refrigeration or other environmental control. An exception is available by contract only. Contact your FedEx account executive for information.
  8. Live animals including insects, except as provided in the Live Animals section in the FedEx Service Guide. (Call the FedEx Live Animal Desk at 1.800.405.9052).
  9. Plants and plant material, including cut flowers (cut flowers are acceptable from the U.S. to selected points in Canada and from Colombia, Ecuador and the Netherlands to the U.S.).
  10. Lottery tickets and gambling devices where prohibited by law.
  11. Money (coins, cash, currency, paper money and negotiable instruments equivalent to cash such as endorsed stocks, bonds and cash letters).
  12. Pornographic and/or obscene material.
  13. Shipments being processed under:
    1. Duty drawbacks claims unless advance arrangements are made.
    2. Temporary Import Bonds – acceptable under the FedEx International Broker Select option, for initial import only.
    3. U.S. State Department licenses
    4. Carnets
    5. U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration export permit.
    6. Letters of Credit. Shipments subject to Letters of Credit are generally prohibited, with the exception of shipments subject to Letters of Credit calling for a “courier receipt”, as defined by Article 25 of UCP 600, shipped using the FedEx Expanded Service International Air Waybill.
    7. Certificate of Registration shipments (CF4455).


  14. Hazardous waste, including, but not limited to, used hypodermic needles or syringes transported for sterilization, recycling, disposal or for any other purpose, or other medical waste.
  15. Shipments that may cause damage to, or delay of, equipment, personnel or other shipments.
  16. Shipments that require us to obtain any special licenses or permit for transportation, importation or exportation.
  17. Shipments or commodities whose carriage, importation or exportation is prohibited by any law, statute or regulation.
  18. Counterfeit goods, including, but not limited to, goods under a trademark, without the approval or oversight of the registered trademark owner (also commonly referred to as "fake goods" or "knock-offs").
  19. Marijuana, as defined by U.S. federal law, 21 U.S.C. 802(16), including marijuana intended for recreational or medicinal use, and synthetic cannabinoids.
  20. Shipments with a declared value for customs in excess of that permitted for a specific destination. (See the Declared Value for Carriage and Limits of Liability section in the FedEx Service Guide).
  21. Dangerous goods except as permitted under the Dangerous Goods section of these terms and conditions.
  22. Processed or unprocessed dead animals, including insects and pets. Taxidermy-finished hunting trophies or completely processed (dried) specimens of whole animals or parts of animals are acceptable for shipment into the U.S.
  23. Packages that are wet, leaking or emit an odor of any kind.
  24. Wildlife products that require U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service export clearance by FedEx prior to exportation from the U.S.
  25. In-bond shipments destined to or being withdrawn from a Foreign Trade Zone or bonded warehouse, unless the FedEx International Broker Select option is selected for U.S. import shipments, or the FedEx International Controlled Export service option is selected for U.S. export shipments.

Notwithstanding any other provision of the FedEx Service Guide, we are not liable for delay of, loss of damage to a shipment of any prohibited item. The shipper agrees to indemnity FedEx for any and all costs, fees and expenses FedEx incurs as a result of the shipper's violation of any local, state or federal laws or regulations or from tendering any prohibited item for shipment.

You may be able to ship these items via FedEx International Controlled Export, FedEx International Premium, FedEx International Express Freight (IXF) or FedEx International Airport-to-Airport (ATA). For information on FedEx International Controlled Export, call International Customer Service at 1.800.GoFedEx 1.800.463.3339 (say "international services"). For information on the other services listed call FedEx Express Freight Customer Service at 1.800.332.0807.

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Chile Restrictions

Other exceptions to import restriction are used ambulances, armored cars, mobile homes, prison vans, street and highway cleaning vehicles, and cement making vehicles.  Importers of these goods pay the 15% import duty plus the IVA.

Fire fighting vehicles are not subject to import duty, and IVA is paid on their CIF value only.

Special laws allow used/new car imports by persons returning from exile, returning after working or studying abroad for a number of years, or domiciled in domestic free trade zones.  These imports are also tax exempt.

Chile applies animal health and phytosanitary requirements for imports of animals and plant based products.  Phytosanitary requirements are applied to imports of wheat, fresh fruit, and poultry.  Chilean authorities have in some cases eliminated specific requirements when presented scientific evidence by U.S. animal health or phytosanitary officials.

Firearms can be imported but they require a special permit from a military authority in Chile.

The importation of pharmaceutical specialties, cosmetics, and most biological and biochemical preparations require prior registration with the Institute of Public Health (Instituto de Salud Publica), and may be subject o special labeling and other requirements, depending on the nature of the product.

Imported goods that are considered inconsistent with Chilean "morals, public health, national security, or environment" require special authorization to enter into Chile.  These include certain person security products such as mace sprays, certain chemicals/processes, and some media products which face review and possible censorship.  It should be noted all films, videos, and TV programs, imported or locally produced, are reviewed for suitability.


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Special Import Provisions

Temporary Entry

Although most goods entered in Chile are subject to duty and tax, goods that are entered for temporary use in an exhibition approved by the government are allowed duty and tax free entry providing certain conditions are met. Temporary importation for other exhibitions or for demonstration purposes are eligible for reduced tax assessment providing the resident end-user arranges for a temporary admission certificate at time of entry and meets other conditions set by the government. Free

Trade Zones

Goods entered into one of Chile's Free Trade Zones (which have facilities for packaging and manufacturing) are exempted from duties and taxes.

Chile's two free-trade zones are the Free Zone of Iquique (ZOFRI) in the northern tip (Region I) of Chile and the Free Zone of Punta Arenas in the southern tip (Region XII). ZOFRI encompasses the free ports of Arica and Iquique. ZOFRI is a major entry point for products bound for Bolivia and to a lesser extent for products going to Peru, Paraguay and northern Argentina. Punta Arenas also has a free port. Modern facilities for packaging, manufacturing and exporting exist in each zone.

Duties and IVA requirements for free trade zones are as follows:

  1. imports entering and remaining in Chile's free-trade zones pay no duty or IVA;
  2. imports leaving the free trade zones but remaining in regions I or XII (considered "extended' duty-free zones) pay a six-percent import duty but no IVA;
  3. imports leaving the free-trade zones to enter the greater Chilean market pay full tariff and IVA charges;
  4. subject to negotiations with Chilean customs officials, imports can remain in-bond for extended periods while awaiting transshipment to other countries.

Imported goods may remain in customs warehouses for 90 days. If said goods are unclaimed after the 90-day period, the goods will be declared abandoned by Customs and sold at public auction.

Personal Effects

Generally, Chile permits duty-free entry of personal belonging to returning citizens and foreign visitors. The goods must fall within the definition of personal goods provided by customs and must either accompany the traveler or within 120 days of his/her arrival.

Samples

Samples into Chile are exempt from duties and taxes if the value does not exceed US$30.00. To qualify as samples goods have to be mutilated. The import documentation accompanying the shipment must also be clearly marked "samples".

Gifts

Gift shipments are acceptable; duties/taxes will be assessed. Gifts and aid to the governments and to charitable and educational institutions which are recognized by the government are eligible for exemption of most customs duties and IVA tax. More information on qualifications for these exemptions is available on the customs website and in Part 0012 of the Chile Customs Tariff.


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Standards

Labeling/Marking
Consumer goods must be marked with the country of manufacture prior to sale. Packaged goods must also indicate the quality or purity, the ingredients, and the net weight or measure of the contents.

Canned or packaged foodstuffs imported into Chile must bear labels in Spanish for all ingredients, including additives, manufacturing and expiration dates of the products, and the name of the producer or importer. All sizes and weights of the net contents also must be converted to the metric system. Goods not complying with these requirements may be imported but not sold to consumers until conversion is made. Thus, foodstuffs labeled in English have to be re-labeled in Chile before they can be sold.

Standards
Products used by the gas, electricity, and construction industries may be required to comply with certain government standards. However, most product standards in Chile are voluntary and compliance is used as a competitive edge.

Animal and Plant Health Requirements
Importation of animal and plant products are subject to special requirements and may require that the exporter provide a Phytosanitary certificate as a condition of entry. Some of these products are subject to additional requirements such as pre-shipment certification of processing facilities, special labeling, and sampling and testing upon arrival. Chile is involved in international discussions about adopting international health/sanitary standards.

Censorship and other controls
To ensure the health and welfare of its citizens, special authorization is required to import certain products such as firearms, certain chemicals, pharmaceuticals or other goods that may adversely impact the morals, public heath, national security, or environment of Chile.

Films, videos and other media products are reviewed upon arrival and can be denied entry if found to be detrimental to the public welfare. Importers of pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, biological and bio-chemical preparation must be registered with the Instituto de Salud Publico prior to shipment arrival and these products often must meet additional requirements such as special labels.

Leather and mineral samples require approval from Ministry of Agriculture

The import of pharmaceutical specialties, cosmetics and most biological and bio-chemical preparations requires prior registration with the Institute of Public Health (Instituto de Salud Publica) and may be subject to special labeling and other requirements, depending on the nature of the individual product.

 
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General Export Clearance Information

All goods leaving Chile must be cleared through a Customs port.   An Export Entry must be submitted to Customs and if the declared value of the good is over U$1000, the exporter must submit a DUS (Documento Unico de Salida) or an embarkation order.

In order to comply with international agreements and to gather statistics, an export license may be required and exportation of some commodities require that the exporter obtain pre-departure export authorization from the government.  Some of the goods subject to this type of control include firearms and other weapons, narcotics and psychotropics, and goods subject to CITES.

For the export of agricultural products (wood, wine, grapes) Customs requires the phytosanitary certificate prior to export.

Exporting from Chile requires:

  1. Export Compliance;
  2. Knowledge of your commodity;
  3. Proper documentation including permits, licenses and related certificate of origins;
  4. Pre-shipment requirements from the destination country.

Document Requirements

Export Permits – Specific export permits are for commodities subject to export controls.  The Ministry of Defense (Ministerio de Nacional Defensa de Chile) is the government office for dual use exports (commercial items that may have military applications).  Other departments and agencies have regulatory jurisdiction and issue licenses for controlled substances and precursor chemicals, for endangered fish and wildlife species, for defense services and articles, for arms and munitions, for nuclear material, equipment and technology, for fuels, for drugs and medical devices.  Before exporting these items, special licenses must be obtained from customs office to insure that the items are not part of the national heritage of Chile.  License requirements are dependent upon an item’s technical characteristics, the destination, the end-use, end-user and other activities of the end-user.  Specific questions pertaining to commodity licensing requirements should be directed to the lead agency.  Agency information, telephone number and basic commodities that might require export permits could be identified by accessing the department and agency web sites listed in the profile.

Exporters must fill out a registration certificate when exporting goods valued over $2000 FOB.  This is to help the government gather trade data.  Other commercial forms used by both importers and exporters are commercial invoice, certificate of origin, bill of lading, freight insurance and packing list.


General Export Clearance Information


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Chile Export Prohibitions

The following commodities are prohibited for export from Chile:

  • Illicit Narcotics and Drugs


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General Export Restrictions

You are prohibited from tendering the following items for shipment to any international destinations unless otherwise indicated, and you agree not to do so. (Additional restrictions may apply depending on destination. Various regulatory clearances in addition to customs clearance may be required for certain commodities, thereby extending the transit time.)

  1. APO/FPO addresses.
  2. C.O.D. shipments.
  3. Human corpses, human organs or body parts, human and animal embryos, or cremated or disinterred human remains.
  4. Explosives (Class 1.4 explosives are acceptable for carriage to Canada, Germany, France, Japan, United Arab Emirates and United Kingdom. Note: United Arab Emirates only allows Class 1.4 explosives to be shipped hold-for-pickup to the FedEx Express facility in Dubai).
  5. Items resembling a bomb, hand grenade or other explosive device, except as provided in the Dangerous Goods section. This includes, but is not limited to, inert products such as novelty items, training aids and works of art.
  6. Firearms, weaponry and their parts (acceptable between the U.S. and Puerto Rico).
  7. Perishable foodstuffs and foods and beverages requiring refrigeration or other environmental control. An exception is available by contract only. Contact your FedEx account executive for information.
  8. Live animals including insects, except as provided in the Live Animals section in the FedEx Service Guide. (Call the FedEx Live Animal Desk at 1.800.405.9052).
  9. Plants and plant material, including cut flowers (cut flowers are acceptable from the U.S. to selected points in Canada and from Colombia, Ecuador and the Netherlands to the U.S.).
  10. Lottery tickets and gambling devices where prohibited by law.
  11. Money (coins, cash, currency, paper money and negotiable instruments equivalent to cash such as endorsed stocks, bonds and cash letters).
  12. Pornographic and/or obscene material.
  13. Shipments being processed under:
    1. Duty drawbacks claims unless advance arrangements are made.
    2. Temporary Import Bonds – acceptable under the FedEx International Broker Select option, for initial import only.
    3. U.S. State Department licenses
    4. Carnets
    5. U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration export permit.
    6. Letters of Credit. Shipments subject to Letters of Credit are generally prohibited, with the exception of shipments subject to Letters of Credit calling for a “courier receipt”, as defined by Article 25 of UCP 600, shipped using the FedEx Expanded Service International Air Waybill.
    7. Certificate of Registration shipments (CF4455).


  14. Hazardous waste, including, but not limited to, used hypodermic needles or syringes transported for sterilization, recycling, disposal or for any other purpose, or other medical waste.
  15. Shipments that may cause damage to, or delay of, equipment, personnel or other shipments.
  16. Shipments that require us to obtain any special licenses or permit for transportation, importation or exportation.
  17. Shipments or commodities whose carriage, importation or exportation is prohibited by any law, statute or regulation.
  18. Counterfeit goods, including, but not limited to, goods under a trademark, without the approval or oversight of the registered trademark owner (also commonly referred to as "fake goods" or "knock-offs").
  19. Marijuana, as defined by U.S. federal law, 21 U.S.C. 802(16), including marijuana intended for recreational or medicinal use, and synthetic cannabinoids.
  20. Shipments with a declared value for customs in excess of that permitted for a specific destination. (See the Declared Value for Carriage and Limits of Liability section in the FedEx Service Guide).
  21. Dangerous goods except as permitted under the Dangerous Goods section of these terms and conditions.
  22. Processed or unprocessed dead animals, including insects and pets. Taxidermy-finished hunting trophies or completely processed (dried) specimens of whole animals or parts of animals are acceptable for shipment into the U.S.
  23. Packages that are wet, leaking or emit an odor of any kind.
  24. Wildlife products that require U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service export clearance by FedEx prior to exportation from the U.S.
  25. In-bond shipments destined to or being withdrawn from a Foreign Trade Zone or bonded warehouse, unless the FedEx International Broker Select option is selected for U.S. import shipments, or the FedEx International Controlled Export service option is selected for U.S. export shipments.
Notwithstanding any other provision of the FedEx Service Guide, we are not liable for delay of, loss of damage to a shipment of any prohibited item. The shipper agrees to indemnity FedEx for any and all costs, fees and expenses FedEx incurs as a result of the shipper's violation of any local, state or federal laws or regulations or from tendering any prohibited item for shipment.

You may be able to ship these items via FedEx International Controlled Export, FedEx International Premium, FedEx International Express Freight (IXF) or FedEx International Airport-to-Airport (ATA). For information on FedEx International Controlled Export, call International Customer Service at 1.800.GoFedEx 1.800.463.3339 (say "international services"). For information on the other services listed call FedEx Express Freight Customer Service at 1.800.332.0807.

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Chile Restrictions

Chile applies export controls through the requirement of an export license, as well as phytosanitary and quality controls on certain products controlled by the National Health Service (Servicio Nacional de Salud, SNS), the Agricultural and Livestock Service (Servicio Agricola y Ganadero, SAG), and the National Fishing Service (Servicio Nacional de Pesca, SERNAP).  Again, the licenses are required more as a means of gathering statistics.


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Regulatory Contact Information

Branch or Agency Name Areas of Responsibility

National Customs Service
Plaza Sotomayor 60, Piso 1
Valparaiso, Chile
Tel: 56 32-200602 or 32-200603
Fax: 56 32-212 819 or 212 841

  • Overseeing and controlling the passage or merchandise at the coasts, borders and airports.
  • Duties and taxes associated with importation and exportation.

Ministry of Finance
Teatinos 120
Santiago, Chile
Tel: 56 2-675 5800
Fax: 56 2-671 6479

  • Financial administration of the country.
  • Proposing the economic and financial policy of the government.
  • Carrying out and supervising various financial activities

Ministry of Health
Mac Iver 541
Santiago, Chile
Tel: 56 2 639 1198
Fax: 56 2 639 4001

  • Controls import and export of medicaments and drugs and issues
  • Drug Import Inspection Certificate
  • Develops health policy
  • Enforces health regulations
  • Consumer protection and food policy

Ministry of Defense
Villavicencio 364
Santiago, Chile
Tel: 56 2 222 1202
Fax: 56 2 635 0136

  • Military Forces (Army, Navy, Air Force)
  • National defense
  • Control of weapons, explosives and other articles of war.

Ministry of Foreign Relations
Catedral 1158, Piso 3
Santiago, Chile
Tel: 56 2 696 4200
Fax: 56 2 696 8796

  • Planning and executing foreign policy
  • Coordinates the activities of other ministries affected by foreign policy.
  • Cultural concerns
  • Ceremonies and Protocol

Ministry of the Economy
Teatinos 120, Piso 10,
Santiago, Chile
Tel: 56 2 672 5522
Fax: 56 2 696 6305

  • Facilitating integrated and sustainable economic growth in all regions.
  • Incorporating new technologies in the public sphere
  • Stimulating new businesses.

Ministry of Public Works, Transportation and Telecommunications
Morande 59, Piso 3
Santiago, Chile
Tel: 56 2 361 3048, 361 3049

  • Plan and construct public infrastructure (roads, etc.)
  • Coordinate and promote transportation and telecommunication development.
Ministry of Mines
Teatinos 120, Piso 10,
Santiago, Chile
Tel: 56 2 671 2481
Fax: 56 2 698 9262
  • Planning and executing policies that optimize the use of mineral resources.
  • Developing new, valuable products.
  • Modernizing and improving mining technologies and resources.

National Copper Corporation
Huerfanos 1270
Santiago, Chile
Tel: 56 2 690 3000
Fax: 56 2 690 3059

  • Exploration, development, and operation of mining resources.

National Energy Commission
Teatinos 120, Piso 7
Segundo Hall,
Santiago, Chile
Tel: 56 2 365-6800
Fax: 56 2 361 1118

  • Planning and coordinating the development and operation of the power sector.

Nuclear Energy Commission
Amunategui 95
Santiago, Chile
Tel: 562 2 699 0070
Fax: 562 2 699 4547

  • Analyzing and drafting sectoral agricultural policy
  • Providing national and international information on agriculture.
  • Participating in the negotiation of international agreements affecting agriculture.

Agriculture and Livestock Agency
International Section
Bulnes 140, Piso 8
Santiago, Chile
Tel: 56 2 672 3635 or 633 3811
Fax: 56 2 671 7419

  • Protecting and improving animal and plant health.
  • Encouraging and facilitating export of agricultural products.
  • Controlling the importation of livestock, plant products.

National Forestry Commission
Avenida Bulnes 285, Oficina 501
Santiago, Chile
Tel: 56 2 390 0000 or 390 0208
Fax: 56 2 696 6724

  • Preventing the deterioration of forest ecosystems.
  • Encouraging the productive commercial use of forestry resources.

National Environmental Commission
Obispo Donoso 6
Providencia, Santiago
Tel: 56 2 240 5600
Fax: 56 2 244 1262

  • Preventing environment deterioration and improve environmental quality.
  • Encourage the protection of the environment and sustainable use of natural resources.
  • Coordinating the implementation of government policies on the environment.

Banco Central de Chile
Agustinas 1180, Casilla 967
Santiago, Chile
Tel: 56 2 670 2000
Fax: 56 2 698 4847

  • Formulating and implementing foreign exchange transactions.
  • Regulating the financial system and capital market
  • Controlling the exchange implications (export returns, import cover, price supervision) of international trade transactions.

Sernapesca
Teatinos 120
Santiago, Chile
Tel: 56 2 698 0543
Fax: 56 2 698 0543

  • Issue the certificate for seafood products exportation

Servicio Agricola Ganadero (SAG)
Av Bulnes 140
Santiago, Chile
Tel: 56 2 670 5555
Fax: 56 2 672 1812

  • Inspection of animal and plants products
  • Issue the certificate for these goods.

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