Canada Country Snapshot

Move Your Bottom Line North: Ship to Canada

Take advantage of opportunities to grow your business in Canada. The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) helps clear the way for simpler exporting, and FedEx offers you fast transit times so your customers get their shipments in short order. It just makes sense to do business in Canada.

View transit time advantages for International Ground from your city.

FedEx provides tools and services that simplify international shipping. FedEx Freight offers next-day delivery to Canada in select areas, and FedEx Ground has recently improved transit times from Chicago to Toronto.

FedEx Service Availability

International Service Availability* Export U.S. to Canada Import U.S. from Canada
Document/Package/Mail Services    
FedEx® International Next Flight
FedEx International First®
FedEx International Priority®
FedEx International Economy®
FedEx International Ground®
FedEx International MailService®
     
Freight Services    
FedEx International Priority® Freight
FedEx International Economy® Freight
FedEx Freight® Priority
FedEx Freight® Economy
FedEx International Premium®
     
Distribution Services    
FedEx International Priority DirectDistribution®
FedEx® International DirectDistribution
FedEx International Ground® Distribution  
     
Value-Added/Industry-specific Solutions    
FedEx® Electronic Trade Docs
Dangerous Goods
Dry Ice
FedEx Priority Alert™
SenseAwareSM
FedEx International Broker Select®
FedEx® 10kg Box and FedEx® 25kg Box
FedEx® Third Party Consignee  
     
Canada Domestic Services Yes

*Availability of particular services may vary by origin and destination. Availability of particular solutions may vary by service selected.  All services subject to the applicable FedEx Service Guide or FXF 100 Series Rules Tariff.  

 

Country Information

Capital: Ottawa, Ontario
Population: 33,212,696
Language: English/French
Weights and Measures: Metric
Currency: Canadian Dollar
100 cents equal 1 Canadian Dollar
Time Zone

Operates on Greenwich Mean Time (GMT)
Daylight Savings Time is observed April through October (plus 1 hour), except in Nunavut, Quebec (Eastern) and Saskatchewan (Not Lloydminster).

Canadian Holidays

 

 

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Trade Group Member

Source: Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT) Web Site, www.dfait-maeci.gc.ca/ North America Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) provides for the elimination or progressive reduction of tariffs between Canada, U.S. and Mexico. The exemption or reduced tariff is applicable only to goods qualified under the agreement as originating goods.

Canada-Chile Free Trade Agreement (CCFTA) provides for the elimination of barriers to trade in, and facilitate the cross-border movement of, goods and services between the territories of Canada and Chile. The exemption or reduced tariff is applicable only to goods qualified under the agreement as originating goods.

Canada-Israel Free Trade Agreement (CIFTA) provides for the elimination of barriers to trade in, and facilitate the movement of, goods between the territories of the Parties, and thereby to promote conditions of fair competition and increase investment opportunities in the free trade area. The exemption or reduced tariff is applicable only to goods qualified under the agreement as originating goods.

Canada-Costa Rica Free Trade Agreement (CCRFTA) provides for the elimination of barriers to trade in, and facilitate the movement of, goods between Canada and Costa Rica. The exemption or reduced tariff is applicable only to goods qualified under the agreement as originating goods.

Numerous bilateral and multilateral agreements, such as the Agreement on Textiles and Clothing (formerly the Multi-fiber Agreement), are grouped under the umbrella of the World Trade Organization (WTO), which is the successor to the General Agreement on Tariff and Trade (GATT). The WTO oversees most global trade in goods and services as negotiated in the various agreements. It also provides arbitration in case of disputes. Most Favored Nation (MFN) tariff treatment is accorded to all countries who have ratified the WTO as well as to the other previous GATT members who have yet to ratify the accord.

Canada-European Free Trade Agreement (CEFTA) Goods may be eligible for a reduced rate of duty under the Canada-European Free Trade Association Free Trade Agreement (CEFTA). The CEFTA consists of a main Free Trade Agreement, which deals with industrial products and selected processed agricultural products, and three bilateral agreements on agriculture signed with Norway, Iceland and Switzerland, respectively, which deal with selected agricultural products. Switzerland and Liechtenstein have a customs union, and the agreement with Switzerland covers both countries. These four agreements are to operate together to eliminate duties on all non-agricultural goods and eliminate or reduce tariffs on selected agricultural products

General Preferential Tariff (GPT) provides duty-free entry for direct importation into Canada of eligible goods from the countries listed in Schedule 1 of the Customs Tariff.

The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) of wild fauna and flora provides for the seizure of shipments prohibited under this agreement and the assessment of fines.

Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) is considering the progressive elimination of tariffs among the Pacific Rim members (Brunei, Canada, China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, and U.S.).

For complete list of Canada trade agreements; click here

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General Import Clearance Information

Clearance Process

FedEx Clearance
Working with Customs officials throughout the world, FedEx has developed innovative technology to eliminate many paperwork-handling steps and expedite the movement of international shipments. This technology is called the FedEx Expressclear electronic Customs clearance system. Starting at the origin, state-of-the-art technology allows the processing of shipment paperwork and electronic transmission of documents to the designated FedEx hub and destination clearance location. The Expressclear system also keeps a database of regulatory information that includes importer numbers, broker designation, corporate contact names and telephone numbers. At a FedEx hub, international shipments are sorted, scanned and loaded onto an international flight. Vital shipment information is keyed into a worldwide manifest database that is linked to computer systems operated by brokers and Customs officials in many countries. Even before the plane has taken off, or while it is in the air, Customs agents and brokers at the destination airport of entry can begin examining shipping manifests, query air waybill data if they need more details, assess duties and taxes, and select which shipments they wish to examine. By the time the plane arrives at its destination, many packages have already been cleared by Customs. As the plane is unloaded, the Expressclear system identifies packages to be examined and prints "cleared" Customs labels for all others. Cleared shipments can be transferred to trucks for immediate delivery. International shipments are scanned at all key points throughout the process and allows for up-to-date status reports including when Customs clearance is obtained.

Customs Clearance

There are currently 256 approved ports of entry throughout Canada. This information can be found on the Canada Border Services Agency site: http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/

Canada Border Services Agency
1 Front Street West
Toronto, Ontario,
M5W 1A3 - Phone 416-973-6413

(For exporters shipping goods to Canada and for Canadian residents and businesses importing goods from other countries.)
Source - Revenue Canada Customs Memorandum D1-4-1, D3-1-1, D3-4-2

There are four primary entry types for importing into Canada:

  1. Order in Council (O.I.C.) clearances for shipments of $20.00 CAD or less; these types of shipments are automatically released through Canada Customs duty and tax-free. These shipments do not require any formal document preparation, as long as there is a full description and valuation shown on the manifest (e.g. air waybill, bill of lading etc.)
  2. Low Value Entries (LVS) for commodities valued at $2,500.00 CAD or less; these types of shipments are generally automatically released through Canada Customs, the presentation of the entry and accounting for the duty and tax are submitted later. In order to account for the shipments a minimum of documentation is usually required. A manifest could be sufficient as long as it fully describe the goods and values, however it is always best to send some sort of commercial invoice that fully describes the commodities in the shipment, their values and origin, so that the duties/taxes will be assessed correctly.
    • Note: Not all commodities valued at $2,500.00 CAD or less may be cleared as LVS entries. Some commodities require HVS entries regardless of value and/or quantity.
  3. High Value Entries (HVS) for commodities valued at $2,500.00 CAD or more; these types of shipments must be released through a more formal process, and this could result in delays. HVS shipments require the following documentation:
    • Manifest, Bill of Lading, Air Waybill or A8A (The carrier's notification document)
    • Canada Customs invoice form CI1 (CCI) or Commercial Invoice or Pro Forma Invoice that provide all data requirements as shown on the CCI;
    • Packing lists, if appropriate;
    • Any other documents necessary to determine merchandise admissibility, such as Import Permits, Export Permits, Form A, NAFTA, CIFTA, CCFTA certificate of origin forms.
  4. CSA (Customs Self-Assessment) clearance is a CBSA initiative to provide certified importers with the ability to clear all non-other government department goods of U.S. origin based on three data elements: business number, date of arrival, and cargo control number. Customs has also provided for specific importers to clear goods of Mexican origin. FedEx, as a CSA approved air carrier, is required to provide and maintain proof of delivery as well as the date for all shipments released under the CSA initiative. The CSA program also provides approved importers, approved carriers and registered drivers with the benefits of a streamlined clearance option for eligible goods. The streamlined option eliminates the requirement for transactional transmissions of data related to eligible goods at the point of entry. The option allows for the clearance of goods based on the identification of the CSA-approved importer, approved carrier, and registered driver at the border. In order to take advantage of CSA clearance, accounting and payment; a comprehensive risk assessment, including a rigorous pre-screening of advance information, must be performed.

The importer of record or a licensed Customs Broker may account for goods once the shipment reaches Canada. The importer of record is the person or firm that will be responsible for any Canadian duties and taxes assessed on the shipment. The Importer of Record has a choice to either use an outside Customs Broker or use Federal Express as their Customs Broker. It is the role of a customs broker to ensure that the shipment is cleared through Canada Customs within the law, and that the payment of duties and taxes are made to Canada Customs.

When a shipment reaches Canada, FedEx will either advise the importer's broker or file entry release documents on behalf of the importer of record (owner, purchaser or consignee) with Canada Customs at the port of entry. Imported goods are not legally entered until after the shipment has been released by Canada Customs. Canada Customs may pull any shipment at any time for review or investigation, which could result in clearance/delivery delays.

Note: In addition to Canada Customs, importers should contact other regulatory agencies when questions regarding particular commodities arise. For example, questions about products regulated by the Plant Protection Act and Regulations should be forwarded to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). The same is true for alcohol, tobacco, firearms, wildlife products (furs, skins and shells), motor vehicles and other products and merchandise regulated by the nine Canadian Federal Agencies for which the CCRA enforces entry laws.

The importer of record or a licensed Customs Broker may account for goods. Dependant on who the Importer of Record has designated as their Customs Broker, FedEx or an outside broker the shipment paperwork will be turned over to that party for clearance with the Canada Customs.

An Agency Agreement form is required for the importation of commercial shipments into Canada. The Agency Agreement must be completed or an original must already be on file with FedEx Canada or your customs broker in order to avoid clearance delays. There are several Agency Agreement scenarios that apply depending on whether the importer of record is a Canadian or non-Canadian citizen or business entity. Please be advised that if FedEx does not hold an Agency Agreement and the importer of record has designated FedEx as the Customs Broker, the shipment will be subject to an additional service fee.

According to Customs regulations, it is the importer's responsibility to keep records of all their transactions for a period of six previous years plus the current year. At any time, Customs may raise importer compliance issues regarding any one or all transactions. Much of the information that Customs is concerned with is provided by the importer's entry documentation.

If it is desired to postpone the release of the goods, they may be placed in FedEx's cage in our bonded warehouse until all documentation has been obtain for appropriate release. The goods may only remain in the cage for 30 days from the date of arrival. If the goods are not released from Customs custody within 30 days, they are reported to the Queen's warehouse.

Storage fees may be applied if an outside broker is handling the shipment's clearance; no storage fees are apply for FedEx brokered shipments.

 

Document Requirements

Source: FedEx GTS, FedEx SRG, and Memorandums D1-4-1, D8-1-7

Air Waybill An air waybill or carriers certificate (naming the consignee for customs purposes) as evidence of the consignee's right to make entry.

Commercial Invoice Required for non-document shipments and to help prevent clearance delays. It should be completed in English or French. If the CI is not completed in one of the legal languages of Canada, the Canada Customs Revenue Agency (CCRA) may request a translation from a party who is knowledgeable of the transaction, which will cause a clearance delay. Specific invoice details are required for a number of commodities including the following:

  • For audio/video cassettes and tapes, the length and width of the tape, a brief synopsis of content and the reason for importation.
  • For textiles, unless stated on the textile declaration, the fabric breakdown, whether knit or woven and, for clothing articles, the gender.
  • For marked/mutilated samples the words mutilated samples or marked samples, not for resale as applicable.

Canada Customs Invoice Form CI1 (CCI) Invoice developed by the Canadian government for commercial shipments to Canada. This invoice holds all relevant information required by Canada Border Services Agency. It is not the document that must be used, but does provide a good guide for information that is required if you are to use your own commercial invoice.

Certificate of Origin - A Certificate of Origin Form A may be required for goods under entry claiming preferential duty or exemption under the various agreements, General Preferential Tariff (GPT). It should be produced at the time of entry and must be in the possession of the importer at the time of entry. Origin of the goods must be detailed on the commercial invoice.

NAFTA (North-American Free Trade Agreement) Certificate of Origin - It must be provided for qualifying goods from the U.S. or Mexico on a high value shipment entry. For commercial shipments under an low value shipment entry, the invoice must include a statement certifying that the goods qualify as originating. Even if the certificate is not required to be presented, it should be in the possession of the importer at the time of entry and available should Customs request it.

CIFTA (Canada-Israel Free Trade Agreement) Certificate of Origin - It must be provided for qualifying goods from Israel under a high value shipment entry. For commercial shipments under a low value shipment entry, the invoice must include a statement certifying that the goods qualify as originating. Even if the certificate is not required to be presented, it should be in the possession of the importer at the time of entry and available should Customs request it.

CCFTA (Canada-Chili Free Trade Agreement) Certificate of Origin - It must be provided for qualifying goods from Chile under a high value shipment entry. For commercial shipments under a low value shipment entry, the invoice must include a statement certifying that the goods qualify as originating. Even if the certificate is not required to be presented, it should be in the possession of the importer at the time of entry and available should Customs request it.

Blanket Certificates of Origin (NAFTA/CIFTA/CCFTA) - Blanket certificates are issued to verify origin for multiple imports of the same commodity over a specific period of time that does not exceed 12 months.

Artwork Statement - The artwork statement is required for duty-free entry of original works of art such as sculptures, etchings, engravings, and lithographs.

Certification of Visual and Auditory Materials of an Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Character - A Certificate issued by Heritage Canada is required to qualify for the use of the following H.S. classification numbers 3705.90.10, 4905.99.10, 4911.99.10, 8524.51.20, 8524.52.20, 8524.53.20, and 8524.99.90. These H.S. classification numbers cover certain audio-visual goods that must be used for instructional or informational purposes by an approved educational, scientific, or cultural institution or society.

Declaration of Antiquity - A declaration of antiquity (over 100 years old) must be shown on the invoice to claim duty-free entry of goods over 100 years old. The statement must include the words circa date followed by the year of manufacture whether known or estimated.

Import Permits Permits are required from DFAIT for the following:

  • Milk and Dairy products
  • Cheese
  • Broiler Hatching Eggs & Chicks
  • Eggs and Egg Products
  • Margarine
  • Wheat, Barley and Other grains
  • Steel
  • Livestock and animals and parts thereof
  • Poultry and related products
  • Softwood lumber and products there of
  • Items listed on the Import Control Listing (ICL)
  • Firearms, ammunitions and explosives
  • Radioactive materials and nuclear reactors

 

Customs Valuation

All goods shipped to Canada must have a value and description for the goods shipped. The value is usually based on the transaction value between the shipper and the importer, in other-words the sale value of the goods. However, if no actual transaction has taken place, for example, a sample or a no charge shipment, there still must be a value assessed; this basically would be the fair market value, or replacement value. Non-tangible items such as a cheque, business documents, accounting documents, plane tickets, etc. must also be assessed a value, but this should be based on the value of the paper rather than the actual value plane ticket or cheque. While duties and taxes would not be assessed on these non-tangible items they still must be reported to Canada Customs. For more information, please visit the following Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) website for detailed information: http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/publications/dm-md/d13/d13-1-3-eng.pdf

Import Duties

All merchandise coming into Canada must clear Customs and are subject to customs duty assessment unless the goods are duty or tax exempt by law. Generally, customs duties are subject to an ad valorem rate (percentage) that is applied to the transaction value (in Canadian dollars) of the imported goods. Some articles, however, are dutiable at a specific rate of duty (so much per piece, liter, kilo, etc.) and others at a compound rate of duty (combination of both ad valorem and specific rates). The dutiable value of merchandise is determined by the Canada Border Services Agency.  Several appraisal methods are used to arrive at this value. Generally, the transaction value of the merchandise serves as the basis of appraisal. Transaction value is the price the buyer actually pays the seller for the goods being imported. The Harmonized Tariff Schedule of Canada (1999 Edition), issued by the International Trade Commission, prescribes the rates of duty and classification of merchandise by the type of product; e.g., animal and vegetable products, textile fibers and textile products. The tariff schedule provides several rates of duty for each item: the "general" rates under Most-Favored Nation's (MFN) and "preferential" rates for specific trade programs (NAFTA/CIFTA/CCFTA/LDCT/GPT).

Antidumping

Under strict enforcement of unfair trade laws, Customs will assess antidumping duties.  Antidumping duties are assessed on imported merchandise sold in Canada at less than the normal price of the good in the manufacturer’s home market (also called fair market value).

Excise Duties

Spirits, beer and tobacco products are subject to excise taxes.

Additional Duties

Countervailing duties are assessed to counter the effects of subsidies provided by the foreign government for merchandise exported to Canada resulting in artificially low prices that are detrimental to Canadian industries.

Import Taxes
Effective July 1, 2010, the existing provincial sales taxes in British Columbia (BC) and Ontario (ON) will be replaced by a single Harmonized Sales Tax (HST), and the existing HST in Nova Scotia (NS) will increase. The HST will consist of the existing federal Goods and Services Tax (GST) and the provincial component (Provincial Sales Tax (PST). Highlights to note:

  • The provincial component of the HST is applicable to casual, personal importation only
  • Commercial imports will continue to be assessed the federal portion of the HST (5%)

Based on an agreement between the provinces of New Brunswick, Newfoundland and the federal government, GST and PST taxes were combined into a flat rate of 13% for the three participating provinces which is known as the Harmonized Sales Tax (HST).

A listing of the different classes of goods exempt from GST can be located at the Canada Customs and Revenue Agency website at http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/tx/bsnss/tpcs/gst-tps/menu-eng.html

 

Customs Fees

Examination Costs

Special service charges can be assessed on some commodities to cover the expense of performing the examinations and or testing required as a condition of the goods entry into the commerce of Canada.  Examinations are not performed on all shipments prior to their release; however, Canadian Customs has the authority to randomly select shipments for examination.

Exchange Controls

There are no exchange controls.

Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT's)

Technical barriers or non-tariff barriers to trade as they are sometimes known as, can cause many problems for exporters looking for new markets for their products. These barriers can be in the form of regulations, standards, testing and certification procedures. The World Trade Organization (WTO) Agreement on Technical Barriers to Trade tries to ensure that these barriers do not create unnecessary obstacles. To obtain further information on Technical Barriers to Trade as well as Notifications on technical regulations and conformity assessment procedures, go to the WTO website at http://www.wto.org/english/tratop_e/tbt_e/tbt_e.htm

Consular Fees

There are no consular fees.

General Import Clearance Information
Advanced Cargo InformationThe ACI program is introducing more effective risk-management processes and tools for unknown and high-risk shipments to enhance the Canada Border Service Agency (CBSA) ability to protect the Canadian border while at the same time facilitate the legitimate flow of goods and trade. In order to support the risk-assessment process, the CBSA will require certain cargo, conveyance and importer data before the goods arrive into the country. It will be mandatory that this data be transmitted electronically in order to ensure quick and efficient processing. The CBSA will use a risk-management approach with sophisticated selection and targeting capabilities to detect high-risk or unknown shipments.

Air carriers will be required to electronically transmit cargo and conveyance data to the CBSA at least four hours before the arrival of the airplane at the airport in Canada or at the time of departure if the voyage is less than four hours.

Admissibility of freight will take precedence over Customs clearance. This could impact the release and delivery of your shipment. In order to avoid delays, please make sure that a valid description and value, as well as the importer and exporter information, is completed fully on the FedEx Air Waybill and the accompanying paperwork.

Administrative Monetary Penalty System (AMPS)

The Administrative Monetary Penalty System is a new graduated regime that will allow Canada Customs and Revenue Agency (CCRA) to impose strong penalties to correct infractions. The introduction of AMPS will result in more costly penalties for both import and export shipments that are proportional to the frequency and severity of non-compliance. For more information on the contraventions and penalties, please visit the following website to view the master penalty document and schedule: http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/

 


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Canada Import Prohibitions

The following items are prohibited via FedEx Express service:

CN274 implementation of the firearms act December 1, 1998

D9-1-1 jurisprudence and revenue canada's interpretative policy for the administration of tariff Item No. 9899.00.00 on goods deemed to be obscene under subsection 163(8) of the criminal code

Coin, base or counterfeit

Customs tariff criminal code importation of offensive weapons

False description of geographical origin of goods and goods with trade marks - tariff item 9897.00.00

Firearms and weapons (Canadian Firearms Center)

Goods manufactured or produced wholly or in part by prison labour

Importation of used or second-hand motor vehicles

D9-1-15 policy for the administration of tariff item 9899.00.00 - hate propaganda, treason and sedition

Used or second-hand mattresses

Personal shipments of alcohol and tobacco

Hemp products such as cosmetics, clothing, food, etc. containing Tetrahydrocannabinols (THC).

  1. Alcohol beverages.
  2. Ammunition of any kind.
  3. All live animals, dead animals and animals that have been mounted.
  4. Money, cash, coins, currency, paper money, and negotiable instruments equivalent to cash, such as endorsed stocks, bonds and cash letters.
  5. Collectible coins and stamps.
  6. Dangerous Goods.
  7. Firearms, weaponry and their parts (and replicas thereof).
  8. Explosives, fireworks, flares, matches.
  9. Furs.
  10. Hazardous materials and hazardous waste, including, but not limited to, used hypodermic needles, syringes or other medical waste (shipments to Canada classified as "Other Regulated Materials- Domestic" (ORM-D) are allowed if they contain consumer commodities only and are properly labeled).
  11. Human corpses, human organs or body parts, human and animal embryos, or cremated or disinterred human remains.
  12. Perishables (including, but not limited to, perishable food/foodstuffs/beverages, perishable pharmaceuticals, and any other items requiring refrigeration or other environmental controls).
  13. Plants, plant materials and seeds, including cut flowers.
  14. Pornographic and/or obscene material.
  15. Tobacco, cigarettes and tobacco products.
  16. Unaccompanied baggage.
  17. Lottery tickets and gambling devices where prohibited by law.
  18. Shipments being processed under:
    1. Duty drawback claims unless advance arrangements are made
    2. Temporary Import Bonds
    3. U.S. State Department licenses
    4. Carnets
    5. U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration export permit
    6. Letters of credit
    7. Certificate of Registration
    8. Shipments moving into or out of United States Foreign Trade Zones or bonded warehouses
  19. Shipments that may cause damage to, or delay of, equipment, personnel or other shipments.
  20. Shipments that require FedEx Ground to obtain any special license or permit for transportation, importation or exportation.
  21. Shipments whose carriage, importation or exportation is prohibited by any law, statute or regulation.
  22. Packages that are wet, leaking or emit an odor of any kind.
  23. Improperly packaged shipments.
  24. Waste or garbage for disposal.
  25. Live insects.
  26. Any commodity that requires Electronic Export Information (formerly known as the Shippers Export Declaration, or SED).
  27. Electronic Cigarettes that contains nicotine, propylene glycol and other chemcials listed on the Canadian Food and Drug controlled substance list.

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General Import Restrictions

 

You are prohibited from tendering the following items for shipment to any international destinations unless otherwise indicated, and you agree not to do so. (Additional restrictions may apply depending on destination. Various regulatory clearances in addition to customs clearance may be required for certain commodities, thereby extending the transit time.)

  1. APO/FPO addresses.
  2. C.O.D. shipments.
  3. Human corpses, human organs or body parts, human and animal embryos, or cremated or disinterred human remains.
  4. Explosives (Class 1.4 explosives are acceptable for carriage to Canada, Germany, France, Japan, United Arab Emirates and United Kingdom. Note: United Arab Emirates only allows Class 1.4 explosives to be shipped hold-for-pickup to the FedEx Express facility in Dubai).
  5. Items resembling a bomb, hand grenade or other explosive device, except as provided in the Dangerous Goods section. This includes, but is not limited to, inert products such as novelty items, training aids and works of art.
  6. Firearms, weaponry and their parts (acceptable between the U.S. and Puerto Rico).
  7. Perishable foodstuffs and foods and beverages requiring refrigeration or other environmental control. An exception is available by contract only. Contact your FedEx account executive for information.
  8. Live animals including insects, except as provided in the Live Animals section in the FedEx Service Guide. (Call the FedEx Live Animal Desk at 1.800.405.9052).
  9. Plants and plant material, including cut flowers (cut flowers are acceptable from the U.S. to selected points in Canada and from Colombia, Ecuador and the Netherlands to the U.S.).
  10. Lottery tickets and gambling devices where prohibited by law.
  11. Money (coins, cash, currency, paper money and negotiable instruments equivalent to cash such as endorsed stocks, bonds and cash letters).
  12. Pornographic and/or obscene material.
  13. Shipments being processed under:
    1. Duty drawbacks claims unless advance arrangements are made.
    2. Temporary Import Bonds – acceptable under the FedEx International Broker Select option, for initial import only.
    3. U.S. State Department licenses
    4. Carnets
    5. U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration export permit.
    6. Letters of Credit. Shipments subject to Letters of Credit are generally prohibited, with the exception of shipments subject to Letters of Credit calling for a “courier receipt”, as defined by Article 25 of UCP 600, shipped using the FedEx Expanded Service International Air Waybill.
    7. Certificate of Registration shipments (CF4455).


  14. Hazardous waste, including, but not limited to, used hypodermic needles or syringes transported for sterilization, recycling, disposal or for any other purpose, or other medical waste.
  15. Shipments that may cause damage to, or delay of, equipment, personnel or other shipments.
  16. Shipments that require us to obtain any special licenses or permit for transportation, importation or exportation.
  17. Shipments or commodities whose carriage, importation or exportation is prohibited by any law, statute or regulation.
  18. Counterfeit goods, including, but not limited to, goods under a trademark, without the approval or oversight of the registered trademark owner (also commonly referred to as "fake goods" or "knock-offs").
  19. Marijuana, as defined by U.S. federal law, 21 U.S.C. 802(16), including marijuana intended for recreational or medicinal use, and synthetic cannabinoids.
  20. Shipments with a declared value for customs in excess of that permitted for a specific destination. (See the Declared Value for Carriage and Limits of Liability section in the FedEx Service Guide).
  21. Dangerous goods except as permitted under the Dangerous Goods section of these terms and conditions.
  22. Processed or unprocessed dead animals, including insects and pets. Taxidermy-finished hunting trophies or completely processed (dried) specimens of whole animals or parts of animals are acceptable for shipment into the U.S.
  23. Packages that are wet, leaking or emit an odor of any kind.
  24. Wildlife products that require U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service export clearance by FedEx prior to exportation from the U.S.
  25. In-bond shipments destined to or being withdrawn from a Foreign Trade Zone or bonded warehouse, unless the FedEx International Broker Select option is selected for U.S. import shipments, or the FedEx International Controlled Export service option is selected for U.S. export shipments.

Notwithstanding any other provision of the FedEx Service Guide, we are not liable for delay of, loss of damage to a shipment of any prohibited item. The shipper agrees to indemnity FedEx for any and all costs, fees and expenses FedEx incurs as a result of the shipper's violation of any local, state or federal laws or regulations or from tendering any prohibited item for shipment.

You may be able to ship these items via FedEx International Controlled Export, FedEx International Premium, FedEx International Express Freight (IXF) or FedEx International Airport-to-Airport (ATA). For information on FedEx International Controlled Export, call International Customer Service at 1.800.GoFedEx 1.800.463.3339 (say "international services"). For information on the other services listed call FedEx Express Freight Customer Service at 1.800.332.0807.

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Canada Restrictions

*Source: - Export and Import Permits Act (EIPA) D19-10-3The importation of certain classes of merchandise may be prohibited or restricted to protect the economy and security of Canada, to safeguard consumer health and well being, and to preserve domestic plant and animal life. Many prohibited or restricted imports are subject, in addition to Customs requirements, to the laws and regulations administered by other Canadian Government agencies that the Canada Border Services Agency enforces. These laws and regulations may, for example, prohibit entry; limit entry to certain ports; restrict routing, storage, usage, require treatment, labeling or processing as a condition of release. Customs release only takes place when the additional requirements are met. These requirements apply to all importation types, including shipments made by mail. The main prohibited or restricted articles are listed below. Importers into Canada should consult with the Canadian agencies governing the commodity for detailed information and guidance.

Agricultural Commodities (Animal and Plant products or commodities for Human Consumption) – Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (ACEIS), Export and Import Control Bureau (EPD)

Alcoholic Beverages – Revenue Canada Customs

Arms, Ammunition, Radioactive Materials – Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT)

Consumer Products (Energy Conservation and Safety) – Health Canada, Canadian Standards Association (CSA)

Electronic Products – Health Canada, Canadian Standards Association (CSA)

Foods, Drugs, Cosmetics and Medical Devices – Health Canada, Export and Import Control Bureau (EPD)

Gold, Silver, Currency, Stamps – Revenue Canada Customs

Motor Vehicles and Boats – Revenue Canada Customs

Pesticides, Toxic and Hazardous Substances – Environment Canada, Revenue Canada Customs

Textile, Wool and Fur Products – Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT)

Trademarks, Trade Names and Copyrights – Canada Customs

Wildlife and Pets – Environment Canada

Hemp Seeds must be sterilized. Import Permits may be required.



NRCan Commodities Restrictions

Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) prohibits the importation of certain energy-using products unless they meet specific requirements. Dealers (i.e., importers and manufacturers who import goods for sale or lease, as well as sellers and lessors) who import regulated energy-using products into Canada must include the following information on the Customs invoice:

  • Name of the product (e.g., external power supply, incandescent reflector lamp, digital TV adaptor, etc.);
  • Model number of the product;
  • Brand name, if any, of the product;
  • Address of the dealer (importing the product); and
  • Purpose of the importation.

These regulations apply to any energy-using product, even if it is part of a larger machine.

Please note that these regulations do not apply to personal importations, medical devices and equipment, or for use by the importer (not being resold)

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Special Import Provisions


Alcohol Shipments

Alcohol shipments are only accepted if the shipper is a licensed distributor and is shipping to a licensed distributor. All beer, wine and alcohol shipments require clearance by the respective provincial liquor boards, the shipper must contact the consignee for a special province procedure. Shipments of beer, wine and other alcohol for personal use is prohibited at all times, including as gifts.

Warranty Replacement Goods/Substitute Goods

Source: Customs Notice N326

Warranty replacement goods can be imported exempt from Goods and Service Tax (GST) or Provincial Sales Tax (PST) in the place of goods previously imported, which have been exported for repair or have proven deficient. Substitute goods are goods loaned by a non-resident to the importer for use while the goods covered by warranty are undergoing repair or permanent replacement is being sought. In either case, the documentation requirements are that the importer or designated representative shall when accounting for the goods submit or in the case of EDI clearance attached to the supporting documentation the following:

a. Statement by the importer in the following form: I,....of...........(Province),
Canada, do hereby certify that.............(Description of the goods) included
in the annexed customs accounting document are entitled to the benefits
of Section 5 of Schedule VII to the Excise Tax Act;

and

b. An invoice or written statement form the supplier of the goods, stating
that the cost of replacement of the goods is being borne by the
supplier under the terms of a warranty.

Replacement goods dependent on the claissifcation of the goods may be subject to a rate of customs duty.

Substitute goods that are imported and classified as duty-free may be documented on From B3 using GST exemption code 55 in Field No. 26 and the B3. However, if the goods are not duty-free they should be imported temporarily under tariff items No. 9993.00.00 on an E29B Temporary Admission Permit. (Note: These articles require special processing and customs clearance, which are not handled under the express carrier operation commitments. Refer to Temporary Imports Section)

Temporary Imports

Source: FedEx SRG

Articles consigned for Temporary Import traveling under Carnets, goods for display, goods for demonstration, goods for exhibition, goods for repair, goods for incorporation into other articles and goods imported for further processing and re-export are not acceptable for importation into Canada, via FedEx International Priority (FXIP) Service. These articles require special processing and customs clearance, which are not handled under the express carrier operation commitments. Clearance delays could be experienced on entries lodged for these types of shipments. Please call 1-800-GO-FEDEX.

Convention/show entries, temporary entries, E29B's, warehouse entries and carnets are not part of FedEx's regular clearance fees and are therefore subject to additional service fees and should be handled by a qualified Customs Broker.


Personal Effects

Personal belongings of Canadian residents are entitled to entry free of duty. Personal belongings taken abroad, such as worn clothing, etc., may be shipped back to Canada and may receive free entry provided they have not been altered or repaired while abroad and prior ownership can be proven. The shipping documents should be clearly marked "Canadian Goods Returned" with the reason why. Items such as watches, cameras, tape recorders, or other articles that may be uniquely identifiable by serial number or permanently affixed marking, should be documented on an identification card at the Customs office at the port of exit. The Identification of Articles for Temporary Exportation form (Y38) would expedite free entry of these items upon return. It’s a simple list of items and serial numbers filled out by a customs officer prior to leaving Canada and can be completed well before your trip.  This certificate is useful for such items as camera equipment, and it takes about 10 minutes depending on the number of items you want to identify.  The certificate is valid for any future trips as long as the information on it remains legible and correct. Registration must be made in person.

Personal effects imported by former residents, beneficiaries, settlers and seasonal residents must be accounted for on a Form B4, Personal Effects Accounting Document. They must personally declare them at customs and sign a declaration statement. If "goods to follow" is declared, they must still be listed on the B4 form at the time of presentation to customs. If the B4 is not available to FedEx, the importer/consignee will be required to personally clear the goods through Customs.  There could also be instances where Customsl may require importers to self clear personal baggage at the clearance port, this is up to the discretion of Canada Customs.  
 

Samples

Source: Memorandum D8-2-8
Samples may be subject to duty free entry if the value is minimal. Samples are items that are being used to solicit orders of the goods represented by the sample. Only one sample of each item is allowed. Shipments of foodstuffs, non-alcoholic beverages, perfumes and chemical products that will be consumed or destroyed during a demonstration and are packaged in a manner which precludes their being used other than as samples will be considered duty-free.

Designer Samples (Textiles)

Source: O.I.C. 1993-1212

Apparel manufacturers importing samples of apparel for the manufacturing of similar goods in Canada may bring one sample of each kind duty free into Canada. Customs requires that the style number of each sample appear on the commercial invoice. The importer must also meet the following conditions:

  1. The importer specifies the use of the apparel sample at the time of reporting the goods;
  2. The importer develops the sketches or patterns, or determines the technical elements of manufacturing apparel; and
  3. The apparel sample will not be exchanged, sold or traded in either the wholesale or retail markets in Canada.

At the time of importation, there must be available, a written statement from the importer declaring that the apparel is being imported for use in the above. The design work cannot be contracted out to a third party. The importer must also be prepared to present proof upon request of how the apparel sample was used and proof of how the apparel sample was disposed of so as to meet the conditions of the tariff item that the apparel was not exchanged, sold or traded in either the wholesale or retail markets in Canada.

 

Gifts

Source: Memorandum D2-1-4


Casual gifts that are either: sent by people abroad to friends in Canada or imported by persons who are not residents of Canada as gifts for friends, are not subject to duty or taxes.

Gift shipments are limited to a maximum of $60 (CAD) per gift. Advertising matter, tobacco, or alcoholic beverages are excluded from the gift provision.

Gift baskets - when within value limits ($60 CAD), CBSA does not require the complete breakdown per country of origin and individual values when destined to a person. The breakdown can be limited to the description of the goods only.

Quota limitations on textiles do not apply to gift importations. Merchandise will not be subject to quota restrictions if the merchandise is imported as a bona-fide gift.

On the OGD requirements, not all goods had to be reported to OGD when it falls within the limit that is entitled to be imported by an individual.

We must report:

  • Fresh fruits and vegetables to CIFTA regardless of the origin, quantity and value
  • Meat if within access and originating from countries other than USA
  • Vitamins, nutritional supplements

 


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Standards


As a member of the World trade Organization (WTO), Canada abides by the use of international standards.

The Standard Council of Canada (SCC) oversees the Canada National Standards System and works towards promoting efficient and effective standardization.


Country of Origin Marking

Source: Memorandum D11-3-1, Customs Tariff - Section 19,

Every article entering Canada must be marked with the country of origin in legible English or French. The country of origin is the country of manufacture, production, or growth of the article. When marking is not feasible, such as when the article is too small or marking would in some way damage the merchandise, then the packaging or container that will reach the ultimate consumer must be marked.

All textile products must be permanently affixed with a readily accessible label containing the following information:

  • fiber content shown by generic name in either English or French as a percentage of total mass for all fibers with a total mass of 100% and in order of predominance by mass;
  • dealer identity shown as name and full postal address or dealer identification number 

Other special marking rules are issued by various regulatory agencies for specific products such as watches and clocks, iron and steel pipe and pipe fittings, manhole cover parts, knives, scissors and razors for surgical, scientific and laboratory equipment.  Cutting, die sinking must mark these articles, engraving, or stamping.  Specific labeling requirements also exist for household appliances, food, drugs, electronics, and containers of alcoholic beverages.

Marking exemptions may apply to various articles due to their own specific limitations, like goods for one time use or articles that are incapable of being marked.

 
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General Export Clearance Information

Clearance Process

(For Canadian residents and businesses exporting goods to other countries.)

Source: - RC4116 - Exporting Goods From Canada, Reporting of Exported Goods Regulations D20-1-0

Canada's export reporting programs have two main objectives:

  • collect accurate information on Canadian exports
  • control the export of strategic, embargoed, and dangerous goods.

Some commodities exported from Canada are to be exported under an export license. Commodities controlled by an export license are under the control of the Export and Imports Control Bureau (EICB). The EICB uses the Export Control Listing (ECL) and Area Control Listing (ACL) as the primary enforcement tools. The ECL is a list of goods that require an export permit. The ACL is a list of countries for which export permits are required to export any and all goods. The EICB expects all exporters to be aware and fully comply with the ECL and ACL. When exporting from Canada the destination country must be verified to ensure that the country is not on the ACL. If it is then the exporter must request an Export Permit that must be provided to Canada Customs at the time the goods are exported. Every person who violates any of the provisions or regulations of the EICB is guilty of an offence and is liable for penalties, fines and imprisonment.


Export documentation requirements vary depending on the value of the goods, destination of the shipment and if the goods are controlled, prohibited or regulated. A bill of lading/air waybill is required for goods exported that are not to be reported to the Canada Border Services Agency. Goods that must be reported require a bill of lading/air waybill, a B13A Export Declaration, an export report, as well as any export permits, certificates, licenses required for controlled, prohibited or regulated goods. There are no reporting requirements for non-commercial shipments, shipments valued at less than $2,500 (CAD), or shipments destined for the U.S./Puerto Rico/U.S. Virgin Islands. Reporting requirements are for all commercial shipments valued greater than $1,999.99 (CAD) bound for non-U.S. destinations. All controlled, regulated commodities require an export permit regardless of the value. It is extremely important that all documents are accurate in every way. Attention to detail is of utmost importance. Canada Customs bases most of their clearance decisions on the paperwork; if there is a discrepancy, this would hold-up the clearance and in some cases result in a seizure of the shipment.

 

Document Requirements
Source: FedEx GTS, FedEx SRG, and Memorandums D1-4-1, D8-1-7

Air Waybill – An air waybill or carriers certificate (naming the consignee for customs purposes) as evidence of the consignee's right to make entry.

Commercial Invoice – Required for non-document shipments and to help prevent clearance delays. It should be completed in English or French. If the CI is not completed in one of the legal languages of Canada, the Canada Customs Revenue Agency (CCRA) may request a translation from a party who is knowledgeable of the transaction, which will cause a clearance delay.

Certificate of Origin - A Certificate of Origin Form A may be required for goods under entry claiming preferential duty or exemption under the various agreements, General Preferential Tariff (GPT). It should be produced at the time of entry and must be in the possession of the importer at the time of entry. Origin of the goods must be detailed on the commercial invoice.

Export Permits – Specific export permits are required for commodities subject to export controls. The EPD is the agency for dual use exports (commercial items that may have military applications). Other departments and agencies have regulatory jurisdiction and issue licenses for controlled substances and precursor chemicals, endangered fish and wildlife species, defense services and articles, arms and munitions, nuclear material, equipment and technology, fuels, drugs and medical devices. License requirements are dependent upon an item's technical characteristics, destination, end-use, end-user and other activities of the end-user. Specific questions pertaining to commodity licensing requirements should be directed to the lead agency. Agency information, telephone numbers and basic commodities that might require export permits could be identified by accessing the Canadian Government web sites listed below.

Shipper’s Export Declaration form B13-A – Used for Canadian exports of $2,000 (CAD) or more destined to non-US destinations.


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Canada Export Prohibitions

CN274 implementation of the firearms act December 1, 1998

D9-1-1 jurisprudence and revenue canada's interpretative policy for the administration of tariff Item No. 9899.00.00 on goods deemed to be obscene under subsection 163(8) of the criminal code

Coin, base or counterfeit

Customs tariff criminal code importation of offensive weapons

False description of geographical origin of goods and goods with trade marks - tariff item 9897.00.00

Firearms and weapons (Canadian Firearms Center)

Goods manufactured or produced wholly or in part by prison labour

Importation of used or second-hand motor vehicles

D9-1-15 policy for the administration of tariff item 9899.00.00 - hate propaganda, treason and sedition

Used or second-hand mattresses


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General Export Restrictions

You are prohibited from tendering the following items for shipment to any international destinations unless otherwise indicated, and you agree not to do so. (Additional restrictions may apply depending on destination. Various regulatory clearances in addition to customs clearance may be required for certain commodities, thereby extending the transit time.)

  1. APO/FPO addresses.
  2. C.O.D. shipments.
  3. Human corpses, human organs or body parts, human and animal embryos, or cremated or disinterred human remains.
  4. Explosives (Class 1.4 explosives are acceptable for carriage to Canada, Germany, France, Japan, United Arab Emirates and United Kingdom. Note: United Arab Emirates only allows Class 1.4 explosives to be shipped hold-for-pickup to the FedEx Express facility in Dubai).
  5. Items resembling a bomb, hand grenade or other explosive device, except as provided in the Dangerous Goods section. This includes, but is not limited to, inert products such as novelty items, training aids and works of art.
  6. Firearms, weaponry and their parts (acceptable between the U.S. and Puerto Rico).
  7. Perishable foodstuffs and foods and beverages requiring refrigeration or other environmental control. An exception is available by contract only. Contact your FedEx account executive for information.
  8. Live animals including insects, except as provided in the Live Animals section in the FedEx Service Guide. (Call the FedEx Live Animal Desk at 1.800.405.9052).
  9. Plants and plant material, including cut flowers (cut flowers are acceptable from the U.S. to selected points in Canada and from Colombia, Ecuador and the Netherlands to the U.S.).
  10. Lottery tickets and gambling devices where prohibited by law.
  11. Money (coins, cash, currency, paper money and negotiable instruments equivalent to cash such as endorsed stocks, bonds and cash letters).
  12. Pornographic and/or obscene material.
  13. Shipments being processed under:
    1. Duty drawbacks claims unless advance arrangements are made.
    2. Temporary Import Bonds – acceptable under the FedEx International Broker Select option, for initial import only.
    3. U.S. State Department licenses
    4. Carnets
    5. U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration export permit.
    6. Letters of Credit. Shipments subject to Letters of Credit are generally prohibited, with the exception of shipments subject to Letters of Credit calling for a “courier receipt”, as defined by Article 25 of UCP 600, shipped using the FedEx Expanded Service International Air Waybill.
    7. Certificate of Registration shipments (CF4455).


  14. Hazardous waste, including, but not limited to, used hypodermic needles or syringes transported for sterilization, recycling, disposal or for any other purpose, or other medical waste.
  15. Shipments that may cause damage to, or delay of, equipment, personnel or other shipments.
  16. Shipments that require us to obtain any special licenses or permit for transportation, importation or exportation.
  17. Shipments or commodities whose carriage, importation or exportation is prohibited by any law, statute or regulation.
  18. Counterfeit goods, including, but not limited to, goods under a trademark, without the approval or oversight of the registered trademark owner (also commonly referred to as "fake goods" or "knock-offs").
  19. Marijuana, as defined by U.S. federal law, 21 U.S.C. 802(16), including marijuana intended for recreational or medicinal use, and synthetic cannabinoids.
  20. Shipments with a declared value for customs in excess of that permitted for a specific destination. (See the Declared Value for Carriage and Limits of Liability section in the FedEx Service Guide).
  21. Dangerous goods except as permitted under the Dangerous Goods section of these terms and conditions.
  22. Processed or unprocessed dead animals, including insects and pets. Taxidermy-finished hunting trophies or completely processed (dried) specimens of whole animals or parts of animals are acceptable for shipment into the U.S.
  23. Packages that are wet, leaking or emit an odor of any kind.
  24. Wildlife products that require U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service export clearance by FedEx prior to exportation from the U.S.
  25. In-bond shipments destined to or being withdrawn from a Foreign Trade Zone or bonded warehouse, unless the FedEx International Broker Select option is selected for U.S. import shipments, or the FedEx International Controlled Export service option is selected for U.S. export shipments.

Notwithstanding any other provision of the FedEx Service Guide, we are not liable for delay of, loss of damage to a shipment of any prohibited item. The shipper agrees to indemnity FedEx for any and all costs, fees and expenses FedEx incurs as a result of the shipper's violation of any local, state or federal laws or regulations or from tendering any prohibited item for shipment.

You may be able to ship these items via FedEx International Controlled Export, FedEx International Premium, FedEx International Express Freight (IXF) or FedEx International Airport-to-Airport (ATA). For information on FedEx International Controlled Export, call International Customer Service at 1.800.GoFedEx 1.800.463.3339 (say "international services"). For information on the other services listed call FedEx Express Freight Customer Service at 1.800.332.0807.

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Canada Restrictions

Source: Export and Import Permits Act (EIPA) Export controls imposed on Canadian exporters by the EPD can take the form of prohibitions such as blockades, embargoes, boycotts, and sanctions or they can take the form of controlled commodities, which require export permits. Export controls may be product specific, technology specific or country specific.

The Export and Import Permits Act (EIPA) holds the ACL and ECL which list the commodities or areas that are under control and must have an export license. Check with the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT) website www.dfait-maeci.gc.ca/ or contact them directly to determine if the destination or goods you are exporting are under control.

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Regulatory Contact Information

Branch or Agency Name Areas of Responsibility
Canada Border Services Agency
Various locations and contacts, see website
  • Application & Collection of Duty and Taxes
  • Enforcement of Import and Export Regulations for Various Departments
Health Canada
Minister's Office - Health Canada
Brooke Claxton Bldg., Tunney's Pasture
A.L. 0913A
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
K1A 0K9
  • Develop Health Policy
  • Enforce Health Regulation
Export and Import Controls Bureau
P.O. Box 481
Station A
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
K1N 9K6
Various locations and contacts, see web site
  • Administration of EIPA
  • Protect Vulnerable Canadian Ind.
  • Implement Trade Restrictions
  • Control Trade of Dual-Use Goods
  • Control Trade of Munitions
Canadian Food Inspection Agency 
59 Camelot Drive
Nepean, Ontario
K1A 0Y9
Tel: (613) 225-2342
Fax: (613) 228-6653
  • Consumer Protection & Food
  • PolicyCoordination
Canadian Standards Association
Various locations and contacts, see web site
  • Canadian standards Certifiers

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