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Brazil Country Snapshot

Why Brazil

As South America’s chief economic power, Brazil possesses vast natural resources and a population of more than 200 million. Strong growth and Brazil’s desire to expand trade ties suggest the world’s No. 8 economy will be a long-term source of international opportunity. 

Early-morning delivery to Brazil with FedEx International First®.

Beat your morning deadlines and reach your customers earlier in the morning. FedEx International First delivers to select postal codes in Brazil as early as 10 a.m. in just two business days.*

Check delivery times from your city to Brazil.

*The expanded service is available on FedEx Ship Manager® at fedex.com.

FedEx Service Availability

International Service Availability* Export U.S. to Brazil Import U.S. from Brazil
Document/Package/Mail Services

FedEx® International Next Flight
FedEx International First®
FedEx International Priority®
FedEx International Economy®
FedEx International Ground®

FedEx International MailService®


Freight Services

FedEx International Priority® Freight
FedEx International Economy® Freight
FedEx Freight® Priority
FedEx Freight® Economy

FedEx International Premium®


Distribution Services

FedEx International Priority DirectDistribution®
FedEx® International DirectDistribution

FedEx International Ground® Distribution

 

Value-Added/Industry-specific Solutions

FedEx® Electronic Trade Documents

Dangerous Goods
Dry Ice
FedEx Priority Alert™
SenseAware®

FedEx International Broker Select®
FedEx® 10kg Box and FedEx® 25kg Box
FedEx® Third Party Consignee
 

Brazil Domestic Services Yes

*Availability of particular services may vary by origin and destination. Availability of particular solutions may vary by service selected. All services subject to the applicable FedEx Service Guide.

Brazil Shipping Options

FedEx offers you a choice: premium services when timing is urgent and economy services when reliability and savings are most important. Take advantage of our most popular FedEx® services for shipping to to Brazil.1

International Service Transit Time Transit Time
  U.S. to Brazil Brazil to U.S.
FedEx International First® 2 business days 2 business days
FedEx International Priority® 2 business days 2 business days
FedEx International Priority® Freight 3 business days 2 business days
FedEx International Economy® 4 business days 5 business days
FedEx International Economy® Freight 5 business days 5 business days

1For additional service options, see the international shipping services chart.

We also offer two flat-rate packaging options for your FedEx International Priority® shipments: the FedEx® 10kg Box and the FedEx® 25kg Box. These flat-rate shipping boxes are free and available at FedEx Express locations, including FedEx World Service Center® locations and FedEx Office® Print and Ship Centers. Learn more about our flat-rate shipping options.

FedEx in Brazil

Since FedEx began serving the Brazil market in 1989, we’ve continually expanded our international express services. Today, we offer a broad range of time-definite express services, including next-business-day delivery to the U.S. With more than 60 locations and 500 employees in Brazil, you can count on us for outstanding service. FedEx is the only transportation provider offering overnight service from select postal codes in São Paulo to North America and the Caribbean. We also provide the best lift capacity in the market at the biggest cargo airport in Brazil.

Brazil Document Assistance

Every country has its own customs requirements and shipping specifications. We’ve simplified international shipping with FedEx® Electronic Trade Documents. By automating the preparation and flow of international documents, this service saves you money while ensuring on-time delivery of shipments to Brazil. The required documents are country-specific, with prompts to help you prepare everything needed for a shipment to Brazil and other international destinations.

Common Documents Description
Air Waybill

A shipping label that must accompany all international shipments. Can be created with an electronic shipping solution, such as FedEx Ship Manager® — or completed manually.

Electronic Export Information (EEI)

Formerly known as the Shipper’s Export Declaration, the EEI must be filed with goods valued at US$2,000 or more from the U.S., Puerto Rico or the U.S. Virgin Islands to foreign destinations. Connect with the federal Automated Export System and submit the required information using the FedEx Ship Manager solution. Using FedEx Export AgentFile®, you can authorize FedEx to file an EEI on your behalf. A filing fee and certain limitations apply.

Commercial Invoice

The main document used by customs officials for control, valuation and duty determination. Serves as the basis for all other documents covering the shipment. Necessary for all shipments with a value of at least US$1 and relating to commercial transactions, regardless of the value. Must be in English or accompanied by a translation. Required details include the buyer and seller, a detailed description of the goods, quantity, purchase price or fair market value, terms of the sale, and the date. Should show freight, insurance, commission and other charges as separate items. Should be signed and, if possible, attested to by a bank.

Pro Forma Invoice

Acts as a preliminary invoice, presenting the same information as the final invoice without claiming payment. Enables the end purchaser to apply for letters of credit, import licenses or foreign exchange allocation.

Packing List

Supplies shipment data, including the number and types of items being shipped. Also documents the weight and volume of your shipment — helpful information for reserving space with the shipping company. Should be signed.

Certificate of Origin

Verifies the country in which the product was manufactured. Required by certain foreign countries for tariff purposes. Must be validated and notarized by a local chamber of commerce.

Price List

A detailed list of all commodities in the shipment with their unit and total prices.

Purchase Order

A commercial document issued by a buyer to a seller on the terms of a transaction, including types of products, quantities and prices.

To avoid delays, all documents must be correct and consistent. The air waybill and Commercial Invoice require some of the same information:

  • "Consignee" is the recipient, the person to whom a shipment is being sent.
  • “Shipper” is the sender, the person with whom the shipment originates.
  • The value to declare for customs purposes is the price paid or payable for the goods, including any selling commissions, assists, royalties, packing and proceeds. It does not include freight and insurance charges.
  • The Schedule B number, or Harmonized Tariff System (HTS) code, is the commodity classification number. For the correct number, go to FedEx® Global Trade Manager or the U.S. Census Bureau website — or call the U.S. Census Bureau at 1.800.549.0595, option 2.
  • Genuine samples up to the value of US$200 are not subject to duties. The Commercial Invoice and air waybill must state "Sample supplied free of cost," and contents need to be marked as samples.
  • A description of the contents includes:
    • What the product is
    • What material it’s made of
    • Schedule B or HTS code
    • Intended use
    • Country of manufacture
    • Parts or serial numbers (if applicable)
    • Quantity and unit of measure
    • Value, per unit and in total

Additional Tips

  • Research your market thoroughly. The marketplace, economy, customs and laws in Brazil are quite different from those you may be accustomed to in the U.S.
  • Ensure your project is economically feasible. U.S. companies should be especially thorough about revenue projections and business goals when entering a market outside the U.S. — other markets may be different than your own.
  • Know your associates. Get to know your business contact in Brazil through your legal counsel, in addition to doing your own research.
  • Establish a very specific contract. With a business associate who resides in another country, it’s a good idea to employ more detailed terms than you might with a U.S. associate, just to make sure everyone's in agreement.
  • Understand your payment terms. Brazil’s payment customs differ from those in the U.S. in many ways, so include very specific payment terms to ensure you are paid in full and on time.
  • Protect your intellectual property rights. U.S. businesses should not yet rely on the same protection of their intellectual property that they enjoy in the U.S. Your best strategy is to protect yourself from infringement before you encounter a problem.
  • Make sure the goods are not prohibited. Check the list of import prohibitions for Brazil.
  • Comply with two types of customs clearance processes in Brazil:
    1. Express Clearance
      • Up to US$3,000 value.
      • Goods cannot be for resale.
      • Delivery Duty Paid is allowed.
    2. Formal Clearance
      • More than US$3,000 value.
      • Importer of Record must be approved by customs and included in RADAR system.
      • Delivery Duty Paid is not allowed.
      • Import License may be required, depending upon tariff code (prior to shipment).
      • Original Commercial Invoice and packing list are required and must be signed in blue ink.
      • Used material/equipment is not allowed. Exceptions are possible for items not made in Brazil.
      • Must be cleared by the consignee-designated broker and shipped with the FedEx Broker Select Option. Indicate “BSO” on the FedEx shipping label.

Support Services for Shipping to Brazil

If you need to: Then go to or call:

Estimate duties and taxes

FedEx® Global Trade Manager

See restricted or prohibited items for Brazil

Brazil Import Prohibitions
Brazil Import Restrictions

Get tips for describing shipment contents

International Document Overview on FedEx International Shipping site

Get regulatory assistance

FedEx International Regulatory Consulting 1.800.851.3336

Get international shipping assistance

FedEx International Customer Support 1.800.GoFedEx 1.800.463.3339 (and say "international services")

Find general support

FedEx Customer Support

Helpful Links

  • U.S. Commercial Service: trade specialists providing counsel and a variety of products and services to assist U.S. businesses with exporting.
  • U.S. Commercial Service in Brazil: market research, details on trade regulations, and contact info for trade specialists and experts in five offices throughout Brazil.
  • Export.gov: resources from across the U.S. government to help American businesses navigate the international sales process and avoid pitfalls in the global marketplace.
  • 4 Reasons to Expand Your Business to Brazil: a FedEx-delivered article on American Express OPEN Forum, an online community for small-business owners.

FedEx Tools

These tools can help simplify the management and processing of your international shipments to Brazil. 

Tools Features

FedEx Ship Manager® at fedex.com

Complete forms, print labels, track the status of shipments, get rates and transit times, and manage billing and claims.

FedEx InSight®

Proactively monitor all of your inbound and outbound international shipments without a tracking number.

FedEx® Global Trade Manager

Find international documents, estimate duties, taxes and landed cost, and more. You can also manage the documentation process with Product Profiles, which lets you create, store and edit information on up to 500 commodities.

FedEx® Electronic Trade Documents

Automate the document submission process, save time and money, and enjoy greater peace of mind.

 


Country Information

Capital: Brasilia
Population: 205,716,890 est.
Language: Portuguese
Weights and Measures: Metric
Currency: The official currency is the Real (R) divided into 100 Centavos.
Time Zone GMT/UTC minus 3 hours in the east, northeast, south and southeast; GMT/UTC minus 4 hours in the west; and GMT/UTC minus 5 hours in the far west. Daylight savings time adjustment:+ 1 hour

 

 

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Trade Group Member

Brazil is a member of a number of international economic organizations including the:

World Trade Organization. Established in 1995, the WTO has a membership of 140 countries. It is the only global international organization dealing with the rules of trade between nations. At its heart are the WTO agreements, negotiated and signed by the bulk of the world's trading nations and ratified in their parliaments. The goal is to help producers of goods and services, exporters and importers conduct their business.

World Customs Organization. The WCO aids the national economic wealth and social protection of its members by promoting honest, transparent and predictable Customs. Established in 1952 as the Customs Co-operation Council, the WCO is an independent intergovernmental body whose mission is to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of Customs administrations. With 151 Member Governments, it is the only intergovernmental worldwide organization competent in Customs matters.

Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons. The mission of OPCW is to implement the provisions of the Chemical Weapons Convention in order to achieve the OPCW's vision of a world free of chemical weapons, and a world in which co-operation in chemistry for peaceful purposes for all is fostered. In doing this, their ultimate aim is to contribute to international security and stability: general and complete disarmament; and global and economic development.

Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna. CITES entered into force on 1975 and now has a membership of 152 countries. These countries act by banning commercial international trade in an agreed list of endangered species and by regulating and monitoring trade in others that might become endangered.

Montreal Protocol. The Montreal Protocol on substances that deplete the ozone layer is a landmark international agreement designed to protect the stratospheric ozone layer. The treaty was originally signed in 1987 and stipulates that the production and consumption of compounds that deplete ozone in the stratosphere are to be phased out.

Mercosur. The Mercosur is an arrangement entered into by the Mercosur Member Countries (Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, and Uruguay) in 1991 to offer preferential tariff treatment to products originating from ASEAN states. Under the arrangement, a Mercosur-based importer will pay a lower tariff rate on a product if it originated from another Mercosur Member Country than if the same product was obtained from a non-Mercosur source.

Rio Group. The Rio group consists of Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela. Its main objective is the Coordination of political and economic policies, the representation of Latin American countries in some multilateral organizations, and the reinforcement of highest-level political commitment to regional integration including elimination of nontariff barriers to reciprocal trade.

Latin American Integration Association (LAIA) or Asociación Latinoamericana de Integración (ALADI). The LAIA, established by the Montevideo Treaty of 1980 is yet another arrangement entered by its member countries
(Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela) for economic cooperation and preferential trade arrangement. Its main objective is the eventual creation of a Latin American common market through flexible tariff-cutting mechanisms; regional tariff and additional bilateral preferences; industrial cooperation; trade promotion, clearing, and credit schemes.

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General Import Clearance Information

Clearance Process

Working with Customs officials throughout the world, FedEx has developed innovative technology to eliminate many steps of the paperwork-handling process and expedite the movement of international shipments. Starting at the origin location, state-of-the-art technology allows the processing of shipment paperwork and electronic transmission of documents to the designated FedEx hub and destination clearance location. The Expressclear system also keeps a database of regulatory information, which includes; importers' numbers, broker designations,corporate contact names and telephone numbers. At a FedEx hub, international shipments are sorted, scanned and loaded onto an international flight. Vital shipment information is keyed into a worldwide manifest database, which are linked computer systems operated by brokers and Customs officials in many countries. Even before the plane has taken off, or while it is in the air, Customs agents and brokers at the destination airport of entry can begin examining shipping manifests,querying air waybill data if they need more details, assessing duties and taxes a selecting the shipments they wish to examine. By the time the plane arrives at its destination, many packages have already been cleared by Customs. As the plane is unloaded, the Expressclear system identifies packages to be examined and prints "cleared" Customs labels for all others. Cleared shipments are transferred to trucks for immediate delivery. International shipments are scanned at all key points throughout the process, and this allows for up-to-date status reports including when Customs clearance is obtained.

Brazil has specific import restrictions with two separate and distinct types of entry regimes: Express and Formal. Please ensure that customers shipping to Brazil are aware of the differences, including the application of duty and tax which can be different even on the same commodity:

 

Express Regime

Cleared by Fedex (broker is not required)

  • Allowed for shipments with declared value up to US$3000.00
  • Goods imported under express regime cannot be:
    • Sold
    • Used on a production line
    • Used as part of a machine at a manufacturing line
    • Inventoried (sold for commercial purposes)
  • Flat rate for Import Duty and Tax of 60% plus 18% GST applied, regardless of product classification (Harmonized Code).
  • Fast clearance (1 to 2 days)

Formal Regime (BSO)

  • Broker is required for clearnace (broker fees apply)
  • No value/weight limits
  • Consignee must have a customs import registration number
  • Formal cleareance allows customer to import for:
    • Resale
    • Use on production line (parts, raw material)
    • Stock Inventory
    • Perform money remittance process (cambio)
    • Temporary Imports
  • Duties and taxes are assessed based on product classification (Harmonized Code).
  • Expect longer clearance times (2 to 5+ days, depending on Broker/Commodity)

All mineral products must have a formal entry into Brazil and special clearance by the Departamento Nacional de Produaco Mineral (DNPM) which may cause clearance delays. This applies to commodities listed in chapters 25, 26 and 27 of the Harmonized Tariff.

Document Requirements

All Brazilian importers and exporters must be registered with the Foreign Trade Secretariat (SECEX) of the Ministry of Industry, Commerce and Tourism (MICT). The inscription number on the Natural Person Register (CPF) or in the General Taxpayer Register of the Revenue Ministry (CGC), of the consignee must appear on the commercial invoice or other documentation for clearance.

Product registration in Brazil is a laborious task. Only companies with local operations have standing to apply for registration of medical products. Depending on the product, the registration may be valid from two to five years and can be renewed continuously for the same period.

Manufacturers must disclose to the local authorities, through their agents, the technical information of the product, e.g., components and parts of the medical devices. In the case of pharmaceutical drugs and cosmetics, one must inform the active and inactive ingredients. Instructions, directions, cautions, labels, brochures, and pertinent information about the products must be translated into Portuguese.

The product registration process often takes more than one year. Should the process take longer than three months, importers and producers are allowed to use a protocol number provided by the Brazilian authorities to distribute their products in Brazil. However, by doing so they assume the risk of product liability claims if their products are found to be unsafe by the Brazilian authorities.

Bills of Lading – No special regulations

Certificates of Origin –  A Certificate of Origin is recommended to be provided for every commodity subject to import licensing and /or quota restrictions from some origin countries. 

Commercial Invoices – Invoices are required for all dutiable shipments relating to commercial transactions between companies and companies, companies and individuals, regardless of the value. Commercial invoices should show freight, insurance and similar charges as separate items when applicable, regardless of the INCOTERM used on the transaction. 

Specific invoice details are required for a number of commodities including the following:

  • Textiles - the fabric breakdown, whether knit or woven and, for clothing articles, the gender;
  • Marked/mutilated samples - the words “mutilated samples” or “ marked samples, not for resale” as applicable;
  • Software on CD’s and floppy disks - The value of software must be shown separately from software support.

Air Waybill – An air waybill or carriers certificate (naming the consignee for customs purposes) is required as evidence of the consignee’s right to make entry.

Declaration of Antiquity – A declaration must be shown on the invoice for goods over 100 years old. The statement must include the words “ circa date” followed by the year of manufacture whether known or estimated.

Customs Valuation

On January 1, 1995, Brazil implemented the MERCOSUL Common Nomenclature, known as the NCM (Nomenclatura Comum do MERCOSUL), consistent with the Harmonized System (HS) for tariff classification.

Import Duties

Duty and Tax

Brazil and its MERCOSUL partners implemented the MERCOSUL common external tariff (CET) on January 1, 1995. The CET levels range between zero and 20 percent, with the exception of tariffs on telecommunications equipment, some capital goods, and products included on Brazil's national list of exceptions to the CET, such as shoes, automobiles and consumer electronics. For products covered by the CET, the maximum Brazilian tariff is now 22.5 percent; the most commonly applied tariff is 17 percent. Duties are levied ad valorem on the cost, insurance, and freight (C.I.F.) of the import.

Shipments by air valued between 51 USD and 3,000 USD are subject to a flat 60% duty and tax on the FOB value of the shipment regardless of the commodity. Medicaments for personal use are exempt from this duty and tax. Tobacco products and alcoholic beverages cannot be shipped via air express service.

Brazil also assesses the following taxes and fees on imports over and above duty and tax:

  • Brokerage Fee --1% of C.I.F. value
  • Warehouse Tax --1% of the import duty
  • Fee for Handling Charges--varies according to value of product (from 20 USD to 100 USD)
  • Administration Commission--currently fixed at 50 USD
  • Additional Port Tax--two fees totaling 3 % of C.I.F. value

A Merchant Marine Renewal Tax (MMR) is assessed at 25 percent of ocean freight charges on imports by sea, payable by the importer. There is current legislation that proposes a reduction of the MMR tax to 10 percent.

Merchandise entering duty free includes newspapers, maps, books, and magazines. Passenger baggage, such as personal clothing, jewelry, consumption goods and other objects for the passenger's professional or domestic use, are exempt from duty and tax. Souvenirs with a value not exceeding 500 USD also enter duty free. Personal effects of individuals transferring residence to Brazil are duty free if accompanied by an authorization by the Brazilian Embassy or Consulate in the country of origin.

Antidumping

Under strict enforcement of unfair trade laws, Customs will assess antidumping duties or countervailing duties. Antidumping duties are assessed on imported merchandise sold in Brazil at less than the normal price of goods in the manufacturer’s home market (also called fair market value).

Excise Duties

Excise duties are payable on a number of commodities: alcoholic beverages, tobacco products, minerals oils, and footwear, rubber, plastic, metals, raw hides & skins and some electric machinery and others.

Additional Duties

Brazil also assesses the following taxes and fees on imports over and above duty and tax:

  • Brokerage Fee --1% of c.i.f. value
  • Warehouse Tax --1% of the import duty
  • Fee for Handling Charges--varies according to value of product (from 20 USD to 100 USD)
  • Administration Commission--currently fixed at 50 USD
  • Additional Port Tax--two fees totaling 3 % of c.i.f. value

A Merchant Marine Renewal Tax (MMR) is assessed at 25 percent of ocean freight charges on imports by sea, payable by the importer. There is current legislation that proposes a reduction of the MMR tax to 10 percent.

Merchandise entering duty free includes newspapers, maps, books, and magazines. Passenger baggage, such as personal clothing, jewelry, consumption goods and other objects for the passenger's professional or domestic use, are exempt from duty and tax. Souvenirs with a value not exceeding 500 USD also enter duty free. Personal effects of individuals transferring residence to Brazil are duty free if accompanied by an authorization by the Brazilian Embassy or Consulate in the country of origin.

Import Taxes

Value Added Tax (VAT)

In addition to the import duty, tax and fess, the following value added taxes are generally applied on imports:

Industrial Products Tax ("Imposto Sobre Produtos Industrializados", or IPI) and the Merchandise Circulation Tax ("Imposto Sobre Circulação de Mercadorias eServiços de Qualquer Natureza", or ICMS.)

The Industrial Products Tax (IPI) is a federal tax levied on most domestic and imported manufactured products. It is assessed at the point of sale by the manufacturer or processor in the case of domestically produced goods, and at the point of customs clearance in the case of imports. The tax rate varies by product and is based on the product's c.i.f. value plus duties; it normally ranges from 0 to 20 percent. In general, a relatively low tariff rate carries a lower IPI tax rate and a relatively high tariff rate carries a correspondingly higher IPI rate. As with value-added taxes in Europe, IPI taxes on products embodying several stages of processing can be adjusted to compensate for IPI taxes paid at each stage. The IPI is assessed on the c.i.f. value plus duty.

The Merchandise Circulation Tax (ICMS) is a state government value-added tax applicable to both imports and domestic products. The ICMS tax on imports is assessed ad valorem on the c.i.f. value, plus duties, plus IPI. Effectively, the tax is paid only on the value-added, as the cost of the tax is generally passed on to the buyer in the price charged for the merchandise. The ICMS tax due to the state government is based on taxes collected on sales, minus those paid in purchasing raw materials and intermediate goods. The ICMS tax is levied on both intrastate and interstate transactions and is assessed on every transfer or movement of merchandise. The rate varies among states, with the predominant rate currently 18 percent. The ICMS is calculated on the c.i.f. plus duty plus IPI.

Customs Fees

It is essential that shippers prepare documents completely and carefully. Failure to make a separate declaration on the invoice of the net weight and value of drums, or other containers that have been used in shipping the merchandise, may subject Brazilian importers to heavy fines.

Once a product gets held at customs in Brazil, in most cases, Brazilian Customs will assess very high penalties -- usually 100 percent of the tax normally charged for the product. Brazilian Customs also frequently seize those shipments deemed to have inappropriate documentation. Brazilian Customs has broad discretion in determining fines or penalties for irregular shipments.

When goods requiring import license are imported without a license, there is a fine of up to 100 percent of the c.i.f. value of the merchandise. When a commercial invoice is absent, the fine is equal to the customs duty. If the original commercial invoice is not available for presentation at customs, the importer can sign a guaranty of responsibility that it will be presented within 120 days. Failure to present the invoice before expiration of the guaranty of responsibility could result in a fine equal to the customs duty.

For under-invoicing, over-invoicing, or otherwise misrepresenting the value of an import, there is a fine of up to 100 percent of the excess or deficiency. If the value declared by the importer is judged to be false, there will be a fine of at least 50 percent of the difference between the duty declared by the importer and that verified. If the appraised value exceeds the invoice value by more than 10 percent, there is a fine of 100 percent of the value of misrepresentation; the fine is 50 percent if the value of misrepresentation is between 5 and 10 percent. There is no fine in cases of error in weight or quantity, but rules are strict.

Exchange Controls

None

Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT's)

Technical barriers or non-tariff barriers to trade as they are sometimes known, can cause many problems for exporters looking for new markets for their products. These barriers can be in the form of regulations, standards, testing and certification procedures. The World Trade Organization (WTO) Agreement on Technical Barriers to Trade tries to ensure that these barriers do not create unnecessary obstacles. To obtain further information on Technical Barriers to Trade as well as Notifications on technical regulations and conformity assessment procedures, go to the WTO website at http://www.wto.org/english/tratop_e/tbt_e/tbt_e.htm.

Consular Fees

Brazil does not require legalization of export shipping documents. Consular authentication of documents are not required.

All Brazilian importers must be registered with the Foreign Trade Secretariat (SECEX) of the Ministry of Industry, Commerce and Tourism (MICT). In January 1997, the Secretariat of Foreign Trade (SECEX) implemented a computerized trade documentation system (SISCOMEX) to handle import licensing, and a wide variety of products were subject to non-automatic licensing. There are fees assessed per import statement submitted through SISCOMEX, and importers must comply with onerous registration guidelines, including a minimum capital requirement, to register with SECEX (the Foreign Trade Secretariat). Complete information on requirements for importing into Brazil is available only through SISCOMEX, which is only available to registered importers. Beginning in October 1998, Brazil issued a series of administrative measures that required additional sanitary/phytosanitary (SPS), quality and safety approvals from various government entities for products subject to non-automatic licenses. These products include, among others, weapons, pharmaceuticals, textiles, radioactive materials, etc. Such shipments are included in this new system but will require an import license (Licença de Importação), which needs special approval from different government agencies. Imports of software, hardware and electronic equipment do not need prior approval from the government. For shipments that require an import license, a Brazilian importer must follow the steps outlined below:

  1. The importer files an application for an import permit (Guia de Importação) for a specific transaction, accompanied by a foreign supplier's pro forma invoice for the product(s) to be imported and back-up information.
  2. The importer classifies the product according to the Common Mercosul Code.
  3. The importer starts completing the computerized SISCOMEX process of the Brazilian Customs, which informs if an import authorization, an import registration and whether an automatic or non-automatic import license is required.
  4. Once the application is approved by SECEX, the importer notifies the supplier to ship the product(s) and to send all shipment documents and commercial invoices along with the exporter's statement, certified by any chamber of commerce or Brazilian consulate located in the U.S., that the prices quoted are those prevailing for goods for export. Only those products now requiring an Import Declaration can be shipped before issuance of the Declaration, but must be received before customs entry. For those products requiring Import Licenses, shipment cannot take place until the license has been issued. Otherwise, the importer will face penalties.
  5. Importers arrange for a licensed customs broker to clear the goods and pay customs duties and other taxes (typically, the Industrial Products Tax (IPI) and Merchandise Circulation Tax (ICMS) and customs charges.
  6. A copy of the import license (Guia de importação) and the paid customs declaration are sent to the importer's exchange broker, typically a bank, for closing the foreign exchange transaction.

It is customary for an importer to retain an expediter (despachante) to assist in moving the import request through the approval process with SECEX and the customs authority.

All shipments to Brazil are subject to duty and tax regardless of commodity, shipper, consignee or value. Shipments arriving in Brazil must have the commodity value properly declared. Shipments without a value will be held by customs and will require special clearance procedures Duties and taxes must be paid even if the shipment is returned to the sender.

Commercial shipments or a shipment with a value over 3,000 USD must be cleared through the consignee's broker and duties and taxes paid.

For FedEx shippers, Commercial shipments can only enter Brazil via International Priority Freight or Broker Select Option services with an Import Permit, license, or exemption arranged by the consignee or consignee's broker prior to the arrival of the shipment. It is advisable to send the required documentation to the clearance point prior to shipment to ensure that it is correct.

All shipment weighing over 150 pounds must be customs cleared by the consignee or the consignee's designated broker and must utilize either International Priority Freight or International Express Freight service (not International Priority).

A commercial shipment is any shipment that is imported for resale, requires an Import Permit, is consigned to a company and exceeds $500 USD, or consigned to an individual and exceeds $3,000 USD.

Registration Requirements

All Brazilian importers and exporters must be registered with the Foreign Trade Secretariat (SECEX) of the Ministry of Industry, Commerce and Tourism (MICT). The inscription number on the Natural Person Register (CPF) or in the General Taxpayer Register of the Revenue Ministry (CGC), of the consignee must appear on the commercial invoice or other documentation for clearance.

Product registration in Brazil is a laborious task. Only companies with local operations have standing to apply for registration of medical products. Depending on the product, the registration may be valid from two to five years and can be renewed continuously for the same period.

Manufacturers must disclose to the local authorities, through their agents, the technical information of the product, e.g., components and parts of the medical devices. In the case of pharmaceutical drugs and cosmetics, one must inform the active and inactive ingredients. Instructions, directions, cautions, labels, brochures, and pertinent information about the products must be translated into Portuguese.

The product registration process often takes more than one year. Should the process take longer than three months, importers and producers are allowed to use a protocol number provided by the Brazilian authorities to distribute their products in Brazil. However, by doing so they assume the risk of product liability claims if their products are found to be unsafe by the Brazilian authorities. For further information on frequently asked questions please see http://www.receita.fazenda.gov.br/principal/Ingles/faq.htm

Tariff Classification

On January 1, 1995, Brazil implemented the MERCOSUL Common Nomenclature, known as the NCM (Nomenclatura Comum do MERCOSUL), consistent with the Harmonized System (HS) for tariff classification.

Inspection

In order to authorize clearance, customs may require a physical inspection of the incoming merchandise. In this case the Import Declaration remains open and the shipment is not cleared until the inspection is completed and all requirements are fulfilled. Upon payment of the import tariff, state tax (ICMS), Industrial Tax (IPI) and port taxes, the customs broker closes the import declaration (DI) and the product is cleared.

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Brazil Import Prohibitions

The following commodities are prohibited into Brazil:

  • Pleasure boats valued above 3,500 USD.
  • Beef derived from cattle administered growth stimulants.
  • Fresh poultry meat and poultry products coming from U.S.
  • Color prints for the theatrical and television market.
  • Dangerous Goods as defined by IATA (Intl. Air Transport Association)
  • Antique
  • Cash
  • Checks, 'cancelled'
  • Money orders
  • Drugs (non-prescription)
  • Poisons - over 20 gr.
  • Precious stones
  • Soil
  • Plants
  • Stamps (collectible)
  • Tobacco
  • Artwork (fine)
  • Porcelains
  • Prohibited for import and export are cash, completed (filled out) traveler's cheques and checks
  • Log and timber products from Liberia (wood chips, poles, post, fence pickets, sheets, flooring, molding, pallet, tool handles, barrels, crates, tableware/kitchenware,shutters, blinds, cases/boxes/chests for jewelry and silverware, clothes hangers, clothespins, toothpicks, etc.)


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General Import Restrictions

 

The following items are not acceptable for carriage to any international destinations unless otherwise indicated. (Additional restrictions may apply depending on destination. Various regulatory clearances in addition to customs clearance may be required for certain commodities, thereby extending the transit time.)

  1. APO/FPO addresses.
  2. C.O.D. shipments.
  3. Human corpses, human organs or body parts, human and animal embryos, or cremated or disinterred human remains.
  4. Explosives (Class 1.4 explosives are acceptable for carriage to Canada, Germany, France, Japan, United Arab Emirates and United Kingdom. Note: United Arab Emirates only allows Class 1.4 explosives to be shipped hold-for-pickup to the FedEx Express facility in Dubai).
  5. Firearms, weaponry and their parts (acceptable between the U.S. and Puerto Rico).
  6. Perishable foodstuffs and foods and beverages requiring refrigeration or other environmental control.
  7. Live animals including insects, except as provided in the Live Animals section in the FedEx Service Guide. (Call the FedEx Live Animal Desk at 1.800.405.9052).
  8. Plants and plant material, including cut flowers (cut flowers are acceptable from the U.S. to selected points in Canada and from Colombia, Ecuador and the Netherlands to the U.S.).
  9. Lottery tickets and gambling devices where prohibited by law.
  10. Money (coins, cash, currency, paper money and negotiable instruments equivalent to cash such as endorsed stocks, bonds and cash letters).
  11. Pornographic and/or obscene material.
  12. Shipments being processed under:
    1. Duty drawbacks claims unless advance arrangements are made.
    2. Temporary Import Bonds – acceptable under the FedEx International Broker Select option, for initial import only.
    3. U.S. State Department licenses
    4. Carnets
    5. U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration export permit.
    6. Letters of Credit. Shipments subject to Letters of Credit are generally prohibited, with the exception of shipments subject to Letters of Credit calling for a “courier receipt”, as defined by Article 25 of UCP 600, shipped using the FedEx Expanded Service International Air Waybill.
    7. Certificate of Registration shipments (CF4455).

    You may be able to ship these items via FedEx International Controlled Export, FedEx International Premium, FedEx International Express Freight (IXF) or FedEx International Airpot-to-Airport (ATA). For information on FedEx International Controlled Export, call International Customer Service at 1.800.GoFedEx 1.800.463.3339 (say “international services’). For information on the other services listed call FedEx Express Freight Customer Service at 1.800.332.0807.
  13. Hazardous waste, including, but not limited to, used hypodermic needles or syringes or other medial waste.
  14. Shipments that may cause damage to, or delay of, equipment, personnel or other shipments.
  15. Shipments that require us to obtain any special licenses or permit for transportation, importation or exportation.
  16. Shipments or commodities whose carriage, importation or exportation is prohibited by any law, statute or regulation.
  17. Shipments with a declared value for customs in excess of that permitted for a specific destination. (See the Declared Value for Carriage and Limits of Liability section in the FedEx Service Guide).
  18. Dangerous goods except as permitted under the Dangerous Goods section of these terms and conditions.
  19. Processed or unprocessed dead animals, including insects and pets. Taxidermy-finished hunting trophies or completely processed (dried) specimens of whole animals or parts of animals are acceptable for shipment into the U.S.
  20. Packages that are wet, leaking or emit an odor of any kind.
  21. Wildlife products that require U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service export clearance by FedEx prior to exportation from the U.S.
  22. In-bond shipments destined to or being withdrawn from a Foreign Trade Zone or bonded warehouse, unless the FedEx International Broker Select option is selected for U.S. import shipments, or the FedEx International Controlled Export service option is selected for U.S. export shipments.

Not withstanding any other provision of the FedEx Service Guide, we are not liable for delay of, loss of damage to a shipment of any prohibited item. The shipper agrees to indemnity FedEx for any and all costs, fees and expenses FedEx incurs as a result of the shipper’s violation of any local, state or federal laws or regulations or from tendering any prohibited item for shipment.

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Brazil Restrictions

Cash, completed (filled out) traveler's cheques and checks.

Dangerous goods as defined by IATA.


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Special Import Provisions

Merchandise entering  Brazil duty free includes newspapers, maps, books, and magazines.

Personal Effects
Passenger baggage, such as personal clothing, jewelry, consumption goods and other objects for the passenger's professional or domestic use, are duty free. Souvenirs with a value not exceeding 500 USD also enter duty free. Personal effects of individuals transferring residence to Brazil are duty free if accompanied by an authorization by the Brazilian Embassy or Consulate in the country of origin. Unaccompanied baggage may not enter duty free. In fact, the percentage of tax is over that of specific legislation for baggage.

Samples

Only documents are exempted of taxes, not considering books and magazines protected by the constitution (Art. 150). All samples must be clearly marked as such on the accompanying documentation. Samples may be subject to duty and tax.

 

Gifts

Brazil does not make allowances for shipments to be cleared as "Gifts". All documentation requirements that would normally apply to commercial shipments are required and any duties, import fees or taxes will be assessed if applicable.

 


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Standards

Labeling, Marking Requirements

The Brazilian Customer Protection code, in effect since September 12, 1990, requires that product labeling provide the consumer with correct, clear, precise, and easily readable information about the product's quality, quantity, composition, price, guarantee, shelf life, origin, and risks to the consumer's health and safety. Imported products should bear a Portuguese translation of this information. Since metric units are the official measuring system, products should be labeled in metric units or show a metric equivalent.

Technical Regulations

In regulated sectors, the appropriate agencies impose their own requirements, ranging from registration of products and laboratories to mandatory certification with the 3rd party testing done in country.

Brazil has in place a number of regulations that are being reinforced. Most newly published rules mandate to safety requirements with evidence of compliance often, but not exclusively, through mandatory product certification. With renovated regulations, it is expected that enforcement will increase.

Legal framework. Federal law established in 1973 the National System of Metrology, Standardization and Industrial Quality, SINMETRO, with involvement from public and private organizations. ABNT, the Brazilian for Technical Standards (Associaçao Brasilera de Normas Técnicas), is the recognized standards organization. INMETRO, a government entity, is the national accreditation body, is responsible for all aspects of metrology and is the operating arm of CONMETRO, the national committee that oversees the work of SINMETRO.

Voluntary Standards

National voluntary standards in all sectors are developed by the Brazilian for Technical Standards (Associaçao Brasilera de Normas Técnicas, ABNT). In some areas, ABNT bases its standards on those of ISO and IEC and on occasion on U.S. standards. ABNT is also a certification organization for both products and systems.

In Brazil, many standards are voluntary. The buyer and seller share responsibility in determining what product standard is applicable. Products conforming to US standards may be fully acceptable. However, products that meet European requirements may be preferred. This preference may be expressed in procurement specifications or in customary design and construction practices.

Testing and Product Certification

There is no legal mandate to date to retest non-regulated products that have been approved in their country of origin. For non-regulated products, some marks and product certification from other countries may be accepted.

For regulated products, on the other hand, the relevant government agency generally requires that the entities that engage in mandatory certification (regulated products) must be accredited by INMETRO. Testing laboratories must similarly be accredited. Testing must generally be performed in country unless the needed capability does not exist in Brazil.

Standards and Regulations in MERCOSUR

Brazil, as an active MERCOSUR member, participates in the development of both MERCOSUR standards and regulations. MERCOSUR standards are developed by a committee where the private sector standards institutes of Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay are represented. The MERCOSUR Standards Association has an Executive Secretariat located in Sao Paulo. Most of the voluntary standards published deal with steel products and cement and concrete. Several hundred additional standards are at different stages of preparation or in the work plan with many in the electrical safety area.

For information on Brazilian and MERCOSUR standards, contact:

ABNT - Associação Brasileira de Normas Técnicas
Av. Treze de Maio 13 - 27 Andar
20003 900 Rio de Janeiro - RJ
Brazil

Phone: (55-21) 210-3122
Fax: (55-21) 240-8249
Website: http://www.abnt.org.br


Asociacion Mercosur de Normalizacion
Av. Mario de Andrade 664
01154-060 Sao Paulo - SP (Brazil)

Phone: (55-11) 823-9846/42
Fax: (55-11) 823-9689
E-mail: secexecmn@target.com.br


INMETRO - Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Normalização e Qualidade Industrial
Rua Santa Alexandrina 416, Rio Comprido
20261-232 Rio de Janeiro - RJ
Brazil

Phone: (55-21) 502-1009
Fax: (55-21) 502-6542
Website: http://www.inmetro.gov.br

 
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General Export Clearance Information

Clearance Process

All Brazilian importers and exporters must be registered with the Foreign Trade Secretariat (SECEX) of the Ministry of Industry, Commerce and Tourism (MICT). The inscription number on the Natural Person Register (CPF) or in the General Taxpayer Register of the Revenue Ministry (CGC), of the consignee must appear on the commercial invoice or other documentation for clearance. Exporting from Brazil requires:

  1. Export Compliance;
  2. Knowledge of your commodity;
  3. Proper documentation including permits, licenses and related certificate of origins;
  4. Pre-shipment requirements from the destination country.

Furthermore, all export transactions of a commercial value must be registered with the computerized trade documentation system (SISCOMEX). Export documentation requirements vary depending on the value of the goods, destination of the shipment and if the goods are controlled, prohibited or regulated. Goods that must be reported require a bill of lading/air waybill, an export declaration, a commercial or a pro-forma invoice, as well as any export permits, certificate, licenses required for controlled, prohibited or regulated goods. All controlled, regulated commodities require an export permit regardless of the value. It is extremely important that all documents tendered for export clearance processing are accurate in every way. Incomplete or inaccurate documentation may result in lengthy delays in customs processing and may result in warehousing and other customs fees.

There are no reporting requirements for all non-dutiable shipments (documents).

Document Requirements

All Brazilian importers and exporters must be registered with the Foreign Trade Secretariat (SECEX) of the Ministry of Industry, Commerce and Tourism (MICT). The inscription number on the Natural Person Register (CPF) or in the General Taxpayer Register of the Revenue Ministry (CGC), of the consignee must appear on the commercial invoice or other documentation for clearance.

Product registration in Brazil is a laborious task. Only companies with local operations have standing to apply for registration of medical products. Depending on the product, the registration may be valid from two to five years and can be renewed continuously for the same period.

Manufacturers must disclose to the local authorities, through their agents, the technical information of the product, e.g., components and parts of the medical devices. In the case of pharmaceutical drugs and cosmetics, one must inform the active and inactive ingredients. Instructions, directions, cautions, labels, brochures, and pertinent information about the products must be translated into Portuguese.

The product registration process often takes more than one year. Should the process take longer than three months, importers and producers are allowed to use a protocol number provided by the Brazilian authorities to distribute their products in Brazil. However, by doing so they assume the risk of product liability claims if their products are found to be unsafe by the Brazilian authorities.

Bills of Lading – No special regulations

Certificates of Origin –  A Certificate of Origin is recommended to be provided for every commodity subject to import licensing and /or quota restrictions from some origin countries. 

Commercial Invoices – Invoices are required for all dutiable shipments relating to commercial transactions between companies and companies, companies and individuals, regardless of the value. Commercial invoices should show freight, insurance and similar charges as separate items when applicable, regardless of the INCOTERM used on the transaction. 

Specific invoice details are required for a number of commodities including the following:

  • Textiles - the fabric breakdown, whether knit or woven and, for clothing articles, the gender;
  • Marked/mutilated samples - the words “mutilated samples” or “ marked samples, not for resale” as applicable;
  • Software on CD’s and floppy disks - The value of software must be shown separately from software support.

Air Waybill – An air waybill or carriers certificate (naming the consignee for customs purposes) is required as evidence of the consignee’s right to make entry.

Declaration of Antiquity – A declaration must be shown on the invoice for goods over 100 years old. The statement must include the words “ circa date” followed by the year of manufacture whether known or estimated.


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Brazil Export Prohibitions

Export controls are imposed on Brazilian exporters by the government can take the form of prohibitions such as blockades, embargoes, boycotts, and sanctions or they can take the form of export licensing and permit requirements for controlled commodities. Export controls may be product specific, technology specific or country specific. The Customs Department holds the list of commodities and areas that are under control and/or require an export license. Contact the Industry, Trade and Tourism Department or utilize their web site http://www.desenvolvimento.gov.br/sitio/ to determine if the goods being exported or the shipping destination is under control.

Examples of goods subject to export licensing controls:

  1. Agricultural products; i.e. grains, cheeses
  2. Dual-use goods; i.e. software, computers, machines and machine parts
  3. Biological reagents
  4. Artwork
  5. Antiques
  6. CITES endangered species flora and fauna


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General Export Restrictions

The following items are not acceptable for carriage to any international destinations unless otherwise indicated. (Additional restrictions may apply depending on destination. Various regulatory clearances in addition to customs clearance may be required for certain commodities, thereby extending the transit time.)

  1. APO/FPO addresses.
  2. C.O.D. shipments.
  3. Human corpses, human organs or body parts, human and animal embryos, or cremated or disinterred human remains.
  4. Explosives (Class 1.4 explosives are acceptable for carriage to Canada, Germany, France, Japan, United Arab Emirates and United Kingdom. Note: United Arab Emirates only allows Class 1.4 explosives to be shipped hold-for-pickup to the FedEx Express facility in Dubai).
  5. Firearms, weaponry and their parts (acceptable between the U.S. and Puerto Rico).
  6. Perishable foodstuffs and foods and beverages requiring refrigeration or other environmental control.
  7. Live animals including insects, except as provided in the Live Animals section in the FedEx Service Guide. (Call the FedEx Live Animal Desk at 1.800.405.9052).
  8. Plants and plant material, including cut flowers (cut flowers are acceptable from the U.S. to selected points in Canada and from Colombia, Ecuador and the Netherlands to the U.S.).
  9. Lottery tickets and gambling devices where prohibited by law.
  10. Money (coins, cash, currency, paper money and negotiable instruments equivalent to cash such as endorsed stocks, bonds and cash letters).
  11. Pornographic and/or obscene material.
  12. Shipments being processed under:
    1. Duty drawbacks claims unless advance arrangements are made.
    2. Temporary Import Bonds – acceptable under the FedEx International Broker Select option, for initial import only.
    3. U.S. State Department licenses
    4. Carnets
    5. U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration export permit.
    6. Letters of Credit. Shipments subject to Letters of Credit are generally prohibited, with the exception of shipments subject to Letters of Credit calling for a “courier receipt”, as defined by Article 25 of UCP 600, shipped using the FedEx Expanded Service International Air Waybill.
    7. Certificate of Registration shipments (CF4455).

    You may be able to ship these items via FedEx International Controlled Export, FedEx International Premium, FedEx International Express Freight (IXF) or FedEx International Airpot-to-Airport (ATA). For information on FedEx International Controlled Export, call International Customer Service at 1.800.GoFedEx 1.800.463.3339 (say “international services’). For information on the other services listed call FedEx Express Freight Customer Service at 1.800.332.0807.
  13. Hazardous waste, including, but not limited to, used hypodermic needles or syringes or other medial waste.
  14. Shipments that may cause damage to, or delay of, equipment, personnel or other shipments.
  15. Shipments that require us to obtain any special licenses or permit for transportation, importation or exportation.
  16. Shipments or commodities whose carriage, importation or exportation is prohibited by any law, statute or regulation.
  17. Shipments with a declared value for customs in excess of that permitted for a specific destination. (See the Declared Value for Carriage and Limits of Liability section in the FedEx Service Guide).
  18. Dangerous goods except as permitted under the Dangerous Goods section of these terms and conditions.
  19. Processed or unprocessed dead animals, including insects and pets. Taxidermy-finished hunting trophies or completely processed (dried) specimens of whole animals or parts of animals are acceptable for shipment into the U.S.
  20. Packages that are wet, leaking or emit an odor of any kind.
  21. Wildlife products that require U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service export clearance by FedEx prior to exportation from the U.S.
  22. In-bond shipments destined to or being withdrawn from a Foreign Trade Zone or bonded warehouse, unless the FedEx International Broker Select option is selected for U.S. import shipments, or the FedEx International Controlled Export service option is selected for U.S. export shipments.

Not withstanding any other provision of the FedEx Service Guide, we are not liable for delay of, loss of damage to a shipment of any prohibited item. The shipper agrees to indemnity FedEx for any and all costs, fees and expenses FedEx incurs as a result of the shipper’s violation of any local, state or federal laws or regulations or from tendering any prohibited item for shipment.

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Brazil Restrictions

Cash, completed (filled out) traveler's cheques and checks.

Dangerous goods as defined by IATA.


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Regulatory Contact Information

Branch or Agency Name Areas of Responsibility
Secretariat of Foreign Trade (SECEX-MICT)
Secretaria de Comercio Exterior
Esplanada dos Ministerios
Bloco J, 8 floor, Sala 812
70056-900 Brasilia, DF
  • Issues import and export licenses and permits for restricted commodities
  • Regulates export laws
  • Promotes export trade
  • Monitors trade compliance
  • Enforces trade restrictions
Ministry of Agriculture
Ministério da Agricultura, Pecuária e Abastecimento
Esplanada dos Ministérios Bloco D
CEP: 70043-000 - Brasília - DF
Enhance the quality of life by supporting production of agriculture:

  • ensuring a safe, affordable, nutritious, and accessible food supply
  • caring for agricultural, forest, and range lands
  • supporting sound development of rural communities
  • providing economic opportunities for farm and rural residents
  • expanding global markets for agricultural and forest products and services
  • and working to reduce hunger.
Ministério das Comunicações (MC)
[Ministry of Communications]
Esplanada dos Ministerios - Bloco R, 8th floor
70044-900 Brasilia, DF
The Ministry of Communications is charged with regulating interstate and international communications by radio, television, wire, satellite and cable.
Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora CITES is an international agreement among governments. Its goal is to ensure that international trade in wild animals and plants does not pose a threat to their survival.
Ministério da Defesa (MD)
[Ministry of Defence]
  • Regulates arms and ammunitions
  • Controls trade of munitions
  • Controls trade of dual-use goods
Ministério da Saúde (MS)
[Ministry of Health]
Esplanada dos Ministerios - Bloco G
Sobreloja DF 70058-900
  • Develops health policy
  • Enforces health regulation
  • Consumer protection and food policy
Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Esplanada dos Ministerios
Palacio do Itamaraty
70170-900 Brasilia, DF
  • Responsible for International Trade Agreement compliance-Internal economic information on Brazil
  • Regulates trade laws and compliance
  • Issues Brazilian laws and regulations
Ministério do Meio Ambiente (MMA)
[Ministry for Environment]
Esplanada dos Ministerios - Bloco B
Sobreloja DF 70058-900
Main issuing agency for environmental laws and protection
Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Normalização e Qualidade Industrial (INMETRO) 
Santa Alexandrina St, 416
Rio Comprido - Rio de Janeiro-RJ -
Zip Code: 20261-232
In charge of coordinating the establishment of standards

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