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Argentina Country Snapshot

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Argentina Domestic Services No

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Country Information

Capital: Buenos Aires
Population: 40,677,348 est.
Language: Spanish (official) English, Italian, German and French
Weights and Measures: International Metric System
Currency:

Argentine Peso (ARS)

Time Zone Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) + 9 hrs..

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Trade Group Member

Free trade agreements to which Argentina is a member to include:

Generalized System of Preferences (GSP) This system of preferences helps developing countries improve financially and economically through exports to certain developed countries by providing duty-free status to numerous products that would normally not be.

MERCOSUR This agreement calls for a gradual elimination of tariffs on goods originating in and traded among member states, and the formation of a Common External Tariff (CET).

Additionally, Argentina is a participant to:

The Cartagena Agreement whose aim is to strengthen integration not only in terms of trade, but also in other spheres such as the political, social, scientific, technological and cultural areas. (This agreement has led to the signing of four crucial conventions in connection with social and cultural policies)

The Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA) whose effort is to unite the economies of the Western Hemisphere into a single free trade agreement where barriers to trade and investment will be progressively eliminated, and to complete negotiations for the agreement by 2005.

Multilateral organizations Argentina is a member to include the United Nations (founding member) and numerous UN agencies such as the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO), United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), the World Trade Organization (WTO), the International Monetary Fund (IMF), International Finance Corporation (IFC), International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), International Maritime Organization (IMO), International Telecommunication Union (ITU), World Health Organization (WHO), World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), World Customs Organization (WCO) and the World Meteorological Organization.

Hemispheric and regional organizations include the Organization of American States (OAS), Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), Latin-American Economic System (LAES), Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC), Latin-American Integration Association (LAIA), Agency for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean (OPANAL). Environmental agreements honored include:

  • The Antarctic Treaty
  • The Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty
  • The Convention on Biological Diversity
  • The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change
  • The Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change
  • The United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification in Those Countries Experiencing Serious Drought and/or Desertification, Particularly in Africa
  • The Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna (CITES)
  • The Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and Their Disposal
  • The Treaty Banning Nuclear Weapon Tests in the Atmosphere, in Outer Space, and Under Water
  • The Montreal Protocol on Substances That Deplete the Ozone Layer
  • The Protocol of 1978 Relating to the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution From Ships, 1973 (MARPOL)
  • The Convention on Wetlands of International Importance Especially as Waterfowl Habitat (Ramsar)
  • The International Convention for the Regulation of Whaling

 

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General Import Clearance Information

Clearance Process

Working with Customs officials throughout the world, FedEx has developed innovative technology to eliminate many steps of the paperwork-handling process and expedite the movement of international shipments. An example in Argentina is the FedEx Expressclear Electronic Customs clearance system. Starting at the origin location, state-of-the-art technology allows the processing of shipment paperwork and electronic transmission of documents to the designated FedEx hub and destination clearance location. The Expressclear system also keeps a database of regulatory information, which includes; importers' numbers, broker designations, corporate contact names and telephone numbers. At a FedEx hub, international shipments are sorted, scanned and loaded onto an international flight. Vital shipment information is keyed into a worldwide manifest database, which is linked to computer systems operated by brokers and Customs officials in many countries. Even before the plane has taken off, or while it is in the air, Customs agents and brokers at the destination airport of entry can begin examining shipping manifests, querying air waybill data if they need more details, assessing duties and taxes and selecting the shipments they wish to examine. By the time the plane arrives at its destination, many packages have already been cleared by Customs. As the plane is unloaded, the Expressclear system identifies packages to be examined and prints "cleared" Customs labels for all others. Cleared shipments are transferred to trucks for immediate delivery. International shipments are scanned at all key points throughout the process and this allows for up-to-date status reports including when Customs clearance is obtained. 

Customs Clearance

In Argentina the Bureau of Customs is the governmental agency charged with the enforcement of the tariff and Customs laws and regulations. Importation of goods into Argentina is governed by a myriad of import regulations, which are not much different from those prescribed in other countries. These regulations and documentation requirements must be observed and complied with by shippers and consignees as well as air carriers to expedite the Customs clearance of imported goods. In general, all articles imported into Argentina are subject to Customs duty and/or internal revenue taxes and enter through a customhouse at a port or airport where Customs examination, tariff classification and appraisals are made. Taxes and other charges due shall be paid (or secured for payment) prior to release from Customs custody. All importations are entered under Informal Entry or Formal Entry except the following, which may be entered duty and tax- free:

  1. Importations for the official use of foreign embassies, legations and other agencies of foreign governments
  2. Importations for the personal and family use of the members and attaches of foreign embassies
  3. Miscellaneous articles that are exempt by law or process

Decree 161/99 and Resolution AFIP 503/99 established a Simplified Importation System and to import merchandise under this optional clearance method. It must not be over 50 kgs as maximum weight. Under the AFIP General Resolution 1811, dated 01/11/2005, the FOB value must not exceed the sum of $1,000 USD per day. Goods that are entered under this system must:

  • Be new, unused and not require reconditioning
  • Not be prohibited for import, nor be subject to quotas or be regulated under other agencies
  • Not be protected by a regulation that implies any type of exemption or tariff preferences

All shipments under the express environment that has not cleared Argentine Customs within 30 days will be re-exported. This new regulation took effect November 21, 2011. Argentine Customs will no longer accept abandoned shipments. Below is the list of commodities that have a higher tendency of being returned due to msising permits/licenses:

  • Cell phones
  • Digital cameras
  • Laptops (value over $1000 USD or with power supply)
  • Used clothing
  • Products contaiing animal or vegetable origin
  • Food and beverages
  • All electrical devices that a power supply requiring higher than 50 volts to operate
  • Promotional items for conferences thta exceeds 50kg weight or $1000 USD value limit
  • Aircraft parts
  • Sunglasses
  • Cosmetics
  • Finished textiles (samples that are not mutilated)
  • Pharmaceutical products
  • Medicine

Note: "Return to Shipper procedures will be initiated requiring shipper to approve and be responsible for return and 10 day storage fee".

Argentina Customs Requirements for Non-Document Shipping:

These requirements apply to all non-document shipments including personal shipments, gifts and items purchased through the internet.

1. The consignee's valid Tax ID number (CUIT, CUIL) is required on the Air Waybill and Commercial Invoice. If the consignee does not have a CUIT or CUIL, the consignee's passport number is required. Shipments arriving to Argentina with missing or incorrect Tax ID cannot be cleared and will be delayed until the information is provided.

2. The consignee is required to present Form 4550/T - Compras a proveedores del exterior (Purchases from Overseas Suppliers) for any non-document shipments.

3.  The consignee must provide proof of Nivel de seguriadad de la clave fiscal AFIP.  This is the security level access provided by AFIP to each consignee. Consignees holding a CUIL must have an AFIP Access level of 2 or above to be granted access to import any shipments into Argentina.

Document Requirements Air  Waybill - An air waybill or carriers certificate (naming the consignee for customs purposes) as evidence of the consignee's right to make entry.

Commercial Invoice - Required for all non-document shipments to help prevent clearance delays. It should be presented in Spanish, however if in English, the Spanish translation should appear right below the English text.

Packing List - Required for most goods and should preferably be in Spanish. The import of some goods in bulk form (i.e.  coal, sand etc.) do not require this document.

Certificate of Origin - A Certificate of Origin is required by the Government of Argentina for certain products such as textiles and footwear as well as for products and parts produced in countries that are not members of the World Trade Organization (WTO). Additional documentation is required in the form of permits, licenses or product certification for goods such as (and not limited to) food, pharmaceuticals, chemical products, cosmetics, agricultural products, textiles and defense material.  

Customs Valuation

All goods shipped to Argentina must have a value and description. The value is usually based on the transaction value between the shipper and the importer, what the sale value of the goods were. If no actual transaction has taken place, such as with samples or a no charge shipment, a value must still be assessed; this would be the fair market value or replacement value. Non-tangible items such as a  business documents, accounting documents, etc. must also be assessed a value, but this should be based on the value of the paper.

Import Duties

All imported goods are subject to an ad valorem duty that is based on the cost of the goods, plus insurance and freight (CIF).

Antidumping

Customs will assess antidumping duties on imported goods sold in Argentina at less that the normal price of the goods in the manufacturer's home market (also called fair market value). Specific information regarding commodities that are subject to anti-dumping duties can be found at the Comision Nacional de Comercio Exterior website at http://www.mecon.gov.ar/cnce/ 

Excise Duties

Alcoholic beverages, tobacco, soft drinks, syrups, extracts, concentrates and consumer electronic products are subject to luxury and excise taxes.

Additional Duties

Countervailing duties are assessed to some goods to counter the effects of subsidies provided by the foreign government for goods exported to Argentina resulting in artificially low prices that have a detrimental impact on Argentine industries.  Specific information regarding commodities that are subject to countervailing duties can be found at the Comision Nacional de Comercio Exterior website at  http://www.mecon.gov.ar/cnce/ 

Import Taxes In addition to the tariffs, imported goods are subject to additional fees and taxes such as:

  • 0.5 percent statistics fee on the CIF value (except capital goods). This tax is not levied on trade between MERCOSUR member countries.
  • Depending on the product, either 21 or 10.5 percent value added tax (VAT) on the sum of the CIF value, tariff and statistics fee.
  • Depending on the product, either 10 or 5.5 percent advanced VAT on the sum of the CIF value and statistics fee on all goods imported for resale (goods imported by the end-user are exempt).
  • 3 percent anticipated profits tax on all retail goods (goods imported by the end-user are exempt).

Customs Fees

A $10.00 USD single fixed customs fee is assessed per transaction entered using the Sistema Informatico Maria (SIM). Merchandise imported using the Simplified Import System is exempt from this fee.

Exchange Controls

Exchange controls are currently imposed by the government of Argentina.

Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT's)

Technical barriers or non-tariff barriers to trade, as they are sometimes known as, can cause many problems for exporters looking for new markets for their products. These barriers can be in the form of regulations, standards, testing and certification procedures. The World Trade Organization (WTO) Agreement on Technical Barriers to Trade tries to ensure that these barriers do not create unnecessary obstacles. To obtain further information on Technical Barriers to Trade as well as Notifications on technical regulations and conformity assessment procedures, go to the WTO website at http://www.wto.org/english/tratop_e/tbt_e/tbt_e.htm

Consular Fees

Legalization of shipping documents is generally not required as a condition of entry of goods into Argentina.

General Import Clearance Information Inspection

Minimum import prices replaced the pre-shipment inspection requirement in its entirety on December 25, 2001 under Resolution 1004/2001.

Registration Requirements Companies wishing to import products into Argentina must be registered in the National Registry of Importers and Exporters. Companies wishing to import through an optional customs clearance method established by Decree 161/99 and Resolution AFIP 503/99 called the "Simplified Importation System" must provide the the companies tax payer number known as the Clave Unica de Identification Tributaria [CUIT]. Commercial shipments consigned to, or shipped from [when exporting from Argentina] private individuals must provide the Clave Unica de Identification Laboral [CUIL] number.

Tariff classification On January of 1995, Argentina implemented the MERCOSUR Common Nomenclature, which is aligned with the Harmonized System of Nomenclature and is utilized for tariff classification.

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Argentina Import Prohibitions

The following commodities are prohibited into Argentina:

  • Used products such as (and not limited to):
    • Spare parts
    • Medical supplies
    • Automobiles
    • Motorcycles and Velocipedes
    • Clothing
    • Tires
    • Boats
  • Dangerous residues (chemicals)
  • Certain toxic substances contained in pharmaceutical products, cosmetics and toys
  • Certain food additives and colorants
  • Products containing polychlorinated biphenyl's (PCB's)
  • Asbestos fibers of the Amphibole and Chrysotile variety (Crocidolite, Amosite, Actinolite, Antofilite and Trimolite) and products containing these fibers.

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General Import Restrictions

The following items are not acceptable for carriage to any international destinations unless otherwise indicated. (Additional restrictions may apply depending on destination. Various regulatory clearances in addition to customs clearance may be required for certain commodities, thereby extending the transit time.)

  1. APO/FPO addresses.
  2. C.O.D. shipments.
  3. Human corpses, human organs or body parts, human and animal embryos, or cremated or disinterred human remains.
  4. Explosives (Class 1.4 explosives are acceptable for carriage to Canada, Germany, France, Japan, United Arab Emirates and United Kingdom. Note: United Arab Emirates only allows Class 1.4 explosives to be shipped hold-for-pickup to the FedEx Express facility in Dubai).
  5. Firearms, weaponry and their parts (acceptable between the U.S. and Puerto Rico).
  6. Perishable foodstuffs and foods and beverages requiring refrigeration or other environmental control.
  7. Live animals including insects, except as provided in the Live Animals section in the FedEx Service Guide. (Call the FedEx Live Animal Desk at 1.800.405.9052).
  8. Plants and plant material, including cut flowers (cut flowers are acceptable from the U.S. to selected points in Canada and from Colombia, Ecuador and the Netherlands to the U.S.).
  9. Lottery tickets and gambling devices where prohibited by law.
  10. Money (coins, cash, currency, paper money and negotiable instruments equivalent to cash such as endorsed stocks, bonds and cash letters).
  11. Pornographic and/or obscene material.
  12. Shipments being processed under:
    1. Duty drawbacks claims unless advance arrangements are made.
    2. Temporary Import Bonds – acceptable under the FedEx International Broker Select option, for initial import only.
    3. U.S. State Department licenses
    4. Carnets
    5. U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration export permit.
    6. Letters of Credit. Shipments subject to Letters of Credit are generally prohibited, with the exception of shipments subject to Letters of Credit calling for a “courier receipt”, as defined by Article 25 of UCP 600, shipped using the FedEx Expanded Service International Air Waybill.
    7. Certificate of Registration shipments (CF4455).

    You may be able to ship these items via FedEx International Controlled Export, FedEx International Premium, FedEx International Express Freight (IXF) or FedEx International Airpot-to-Airport (ATA). For information on FedEx International Controlled Export, call International Customer Service at 1.800.GoFedEx 1.800.463.3339 (say “international services’). For information on the other services listed call FedEx Express Freight Customer Service at 1.800.332.0807.
  13. Hazardous waste, including, but not limited to, used hypodermic needles or syringes or other medial waste.
  14. Shipments that may cause damage to, or delay of, equipment, personnel or other shipments.
  15. Shipments that require us to obtain any special licenses or permit for transportation, importation or exportation.
  16. Shipments or commodities whose carriage, importation or exportation is prohibited by any law, statute or regulation.
  17. Shipments with a declared value for customs in excess of that permitted for a specific destination. (See the Declared Value for Carriage and Limits of Liability section in the FedEx Service Guide).
  18. Dangerous goods except as permitted under the Dangerous Goods section of these terms and conditions.
  19. Processed or unprocessed dead animals, including insects and pets. Taxidermy-finished hunting trophies or completely processed (dried) specimens of whole animals or parts of animals are acceptable for shipment into the U.S.
  20. Packages that are wet, leaking or emit an odor of any kind.
  21. Wildlife products that require U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service export clearance by FedEx prior to exportation from the U.S.
  22. In-bond shipments destined to or being withdrawn from a Foreign Trade Zone or bonded warehouse, unless the FedEx International Broker Select option is selected for U.S. import shipments, or the FedEx International Controlled Export service option is selected for U.S. export shipments.

Not withstanding any other provision of the FedEx Service Guide, we are not liable for delay of, loss of damage to a shipment of any prohibited item. The shipper agrees to indemnity FedEx for any and all costs, fees and expenses FedEx incurs as a result of the shipper’s violation of any local, state or federal laws or regulations or from tendering any prohibited item for shipment.

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Argentina Restrictions

Currently the Government of Argentina imposes quotas for the importation of peaches, white glasses for corrective spectacles, automobile parts, paper, pulp and footwear. Pharmaceuticals, chemical products, insecticides, veterinary products, medical devices, cosmetics, agricultural products, textiles and defense material require various approval prior to import from various regulatory agencies.

The following commodities are prohibited via FedEx International Priority (IP) services into Argentina. However, you may be able to use another FedEx service for shipping these items.  For additional shipping options, please contact your local FedEx customer service representative.

  • Airline tickets, blank stock
  • Antiques
  • Bearer bonds
  • Collectable coins
  • Blank credit cards
  • Credit cards, other than telephone cards
  • Firearms, parts
  • Poisons (toxics)
  • Non-negotiable stocks
  • Blue ice
  • Radioactive and explosive material

  Argentina has restrictions on consumer goods at import (Resolution No. 3252). Under the Anticipated Imports Sworn Statement (Declaracion Jurada Anticipada de Importacion - DJAI), importers must declare shipments they wish to import into Argentina prior to shipping.   Shipments allowed to be cleared under the express regime are exempt from this regulation. Argentina customs regulations for express shipments limit the weight/value per shipment to 50kg or $1000USD. However, any shipment sent IP BSO or express shipments containing restricted commodities regardless of value that cannot be cleared under the express regime are subject to DJAI. Per customs, shipments that do not meet the new DJAI requirements will be returned to the shipper at their expense.   The commodities listed below have a higher tendency of being subject to DJAI requirements:

  • Cell phones
  • Digital cameras
  • Laptops (value over $1,000 USD or with power supply)
  • Used clothing
  • Food and beverages
  • Products containing animal or vegetable origin
  • All electrical devices that have a power supply requiring higher than 50 volts to operate
  • Promotional items for conferences that exceed 50kg weight or $1,000 USD value limit)
  • Aircraft parts
  • Sunglasses
  • Cosmetics
  • Finished textiles (samples that are not mutilated)
  • Pharmaceutical products
  • Medicine


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Special Import Provisions

Free Trade Zones Argentine Law authorizes the Federal Government to create one Free Trade Zone (FTZ) in each province and it delegates to the executive branch the authority to create the foreign trade or export processing zones. There are currently 10 FTZ's in Argentina:

  • La Plate Free Trade Zone (ZFLP)
  • San Luis Free Trade Zone
  • Cordoba Free Trade Zone
  • Tucuman Free Trade Zone
  • Mendoza Free Trade Zone
  • Santa Fe Free Trade Zone
  • Comodoro Rivadavia Free Trade Zone
  • Salta Free Trade Zone
  • Misiones Free Trade Zone
  • La Pampa Free Trade Zone

In addition to the free trade zones, Tierra del Fuego has a Special Customs Area regime, which allows duty-free entry of cap goods not produced in Argentina with an end use in designated high-priority industry as well as for assembly in local plants and sale in Argentina. Other imports through this area receive a 50 percent reduction on normal tariff rates. This area will continue to function until 2013 for non-bloc goods.

Personal Effects

Personal working items such as computers or tools of the trade must be registered with customs at the time of entry and again upon departure from Argentina.

Samples

Samples sent by parcel post or in other ways are treated the same as any other commercial shipment and have the same documentary requirements. The services of customhouse brokers are generally not necessary to clear shipments of samples with or without value. Samples valued less than CIF 100 USD are free of duties and taxes.  The commercial invoice should clearly state that the goods have "no commercial value" if they qualify as such.

Gifts

Articles imported as gifts may be subject to duties and taxes (donations to duly registered relief organizations may enter free of duties and taxes when accompanied by a Certificado de Donacion obtained from the Argentine Consulate prior to shipping).


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Standards

Argentina has a national system for standards, certification and accreditation for the stated purpose of promoting the quality of goods and services in an industrial, modern economy with global markets. As a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO), it abides the use of international standards to the maximum extent possible. Standards are developed by the Instituto Argentino de Normalizacion (IRAM), patterned after various European countries (many are compatible with U.S. standards), and are voluntary (where the buyer and seller determine which product standard is applicable).

Country of Origin Marking

The general rules for marking the country of origin are as follows: "if any marking appears on the article itself, the country of origin must also appear in a visible place. If the wrapper or principal label on the article is too small for other marks to appear on it, showing the country of origin in a visible place on the container is sufficient. If, however, the principal label is too small to bear an indication of the country of origin, the required indication may be shown on a supplementary label attached to the container on the same side as the principal label." All non-packaged products sold in Argentina are required to have the following information on a printed label: the name/description of the product, the country of origin and the quality, purity or blending description. If the products are packaged, they should also list the net weight using the metric system.  While labels should be in Spanish, it is acceptable to have a sticker or label attached to the original label with the required data in Spanish. More detailed labeling requirements exist for various items such as: medical goods, hazardous materials, food, beverages, textile and apparel and footwear and it is recommended to contact the government regulatory bodies for each industry to obtain more commodity specific labeling information.

 
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General Export Clearance Information

Clearance Process

Exporting from Argentina requires knowledge of the commodity, the proper documentation and export compliance.  The value of the goods, destination of the shipment and if the goods are controlled, prohibited or regulated will determine the specific export requirements.

Export Duties

Commodities exported from Argentina are subject to duties, which range from 5% to 20% (they vary per product type) of the FOB value of the commodity.

Embargoed Countries

Argentina has been a member state of the United Nations since October 24, 1945, and as such honors any import or export sanctions imposed against designated countries under the United Nations Act 1946.

Registration requirements

Exporters should be registered with the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) or the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC): with the city or the municipality where the business will operate, as well as with the Bureau of Internal revenue.

Document Requirements

Export documentation requirements vary on the type of goods being exported. Goods that are controlled or restricted for export may require licenses or specific certifications in addition to an air waybill and commercial invoice.


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Argentina Export Prohibitions

The following commodities are prohibited out of Argentina:

  • Logs
  • Certain works of art
  • Certain products of endangered species


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General Export Restrictions

The following items are not acceptable for carriage to any international destinations unless otherwise indicated. (Additional restrictions may apply depending on destination. Various regulatory clearances in addition to customs clearance may be required for certain commodities, thereby extending the transit time.)

  1. APO/FPO addresses.
  2. C.O.D. shipments.
  3. Human corpses, human organs or body parts, human and animal embryos, or cremated or disinterred human remains.
  4. Explosives (Class 1.4 explosives are acceptable for carriage to Canada, Germany, France, Japan, United Arab Emirates and United Kingdom. Note: United Arab Emirates only allows Class 1.4 explosives to be shipped hold-for-pickup to the FedEx Express facility in Dubai).
  5. Firearms, weaponry and their parts (acceptable between the U.S. and Puerto Rico).
  6. Perishable foodstuffs and foods and beverages requiring refrigeration or other environmental control.
  7. Live animals including insects, except as provided in the Live Animals section in the FedEx Service Guide. (Call the FedEx Live Animal Desk at 1.800.405.9052).
  8. Plants and plant material, including cut flowers (cut flowers are acceptable from the U.S. to selected points in Canada and from Colombia, Ecuador and the Netherlands to the U.S.).
  9. Lottery tickets and gambling devices where prohibited by law.
  10. Money (coins, cash, currency, paper money and negotiable instruments equivalent to cash such as endorsed stocks, bonds and cash letters).
  11. Pornographic and/or obscene material.
  12. Shipments being processed under:
    1. Duty drawbacks claims unless advance arrangements are made.
    2. Temporary Import Bonds – acceptable under the FedEx International Broker Select option, for initial import only.
    3. U.S. State Department licenses
    4. Carnets
    5. U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration export permit.
    6. Letters of Credit. Shipments subject to Letters of Credit are generally prohibited, with the exception of shipments subject to Letters of Credit calling for a “courier receipt”, as defined by Article 25 of UCP 600, shipped using the FedEx Expanded Service International Air Waybill.
    7. Certificate of Registration shipments (CF4455).

    You may be able to ship these items via FedEx International Controlled Export, FedEx International Premium, FedEx International Express Freight (IXF) or FedEx International Airpot-to-Airport (ATA). For information on FedEx International Controlled Export, call International Customer Service at 1.800.GoFedEx 1.800.463.3339 (say “international services’). For information on the other services listed call FedEx Express Freight Customer Service at 1.800.332.0807.
  13. Hazardous waste, including, but not limited to, used hypodermic needles or syringes or other medial waste.
  14. Shipments that may cause damage to, or delay of, equipment, personnel or other shipments.
  15. Shipments that require us to obtain any special licenses or permit for transportation, importation or exportation.
  16. Shipments or commodities whose carriage, importation or exportation is prohibited by any law, statute or regulation.
  17. Shipments with a declared value for customs in excess of that permitted for a specific destination. (See the Declared Value for Carriage and Limits of Liability section in the FedEx Service Guide).
  18. Dangerous goods except as permitted under the Dangerous Goods section of these terms and conditions.
  19. Processed or unprocessed dead animals, including insects and pets. Taxidermy-finished hunting trophies or completely processed (dried) specimens of whole animals or parts of animals are acceptable for shipment into the U.S.
  20. Packages that are wet, leaking or emit an odor of any kind.
  21. Wildlife products that require U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service export clearance by FedEx prior to exportation from the U.S.
  22. In-bond shipments destined to or being withdrawn from a Foreign Trade Zone or bonded warehouse, unless the FedEx International Broker Select option is selected for U.S. import shipments, or the FedEx International Controlled Export service option is selected for U.S. export shipments.
Not withstanding any other provision of the FedEx Service Guide, we are not liable for delay of, loss of damage to a shipment of any prohibited item. The shipper agrees to indemnity FedEx for any and all costs, fees and expenses FedEx incurs as a result of the shipper’s violation of any local, state or federal laws or regulations or from tendering any prohibited item for shipment.

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Argentina Restrictions

The following commodities are prohibited via FedEx International Priority (IP) services out of Argentina.  However, you may be able to use another FedEx service for shipping these items. For additional shipping options, please contact your local FedEx customer service representative.

  • Airline tickets, blank stock
  • Antiques
  • Bearer bonds
  • Collectable coins
  • Blank credit cards
  • Credit cards, other than telephone cards
  • Firearms, parts
  • Poisons (toxics)
  • Non-negotiable stocks
  • Blue ice
  • Radioactive and explosive material

Certain commodities may be subject to export controls, which may require additional documentation such as:

  • Export Licensing for Dual Use Goods (goods that may be used in either military or civilian application) which are controlled by the Comision Nacional de Control de Exportaciones Sensitivas y Material Belico (CONCESYMB). The commission consists of an integration of the Foreign Ministry, the Ministry of Defense and Argentine Customs.
  • Sanitary, phytosanitary or safety standard certification for products such as meat, seeds, fruit, vegetables and marine goods.
  • Additional products that are controlled for export include psychotropic substances and endangered fish and wildlife species.


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Regulatory Contact Information

Branch or Agency Name Areas of Responsibility

Institiuto Argentino de Normalizacion (IRAM)
Peru 552/556
C1068AAB Buenos Aires, Argentina
Phone 5411-4346-0600
Fax: 5411-4346-0601

  • Responsible for developing national voluntary standards in all fields and certifying product and system conformity.

Administracion Nacional de Medicamentos, Alimentos y Tecnologia Medica (ANMAT)
Avenida de Mayo 869 3er piso
1084 Buenos Aires, Argentina
Phone: 5411-345-7145
Fax: 5411-345-7145

  • Responsible for regulating standard compliance and consumer protection for medication, foodstuff and medical technology.

Authoridad Regulatoria Nuclear
Sede Central
Av. Del Libertador 8250
Capital Federal
1429 Buenos Aires, Argentina
Phone: 5411-6323-01356
Fax: 5411-6323-1771 or 5411-6323-1798

  • Responsible for regulating and controlling nuclear and radiological activities.

Secretaria de Agricultura, Ganaderia, Pesca y Alimentacion
Av. Paseo Colon 982 3er Piso Of. 146
1063 Buenos Aires, Argentina
Phone: 5411-4349-2000
Fax: 5411-4349-2504

  • Responsible for regulating agricultural food health quality.

Secretaria de Energia
Paseo Colon 171
Capital Federal
Buenos Aires, Argentina

  • Responsible for regulating combustible and electrical energy.

Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores, Comercio Internacional y Culto
Esmeralda 1212
1007 Capital Federal, Argentina
Phone: 5411-4819-7000
Fax: 5411-

  • Responsible for facilitating international trade and overseeing cultural issues.

Ministerio de Salud
Av. 9 de Julio 1925
Capital Federal
1332 Buenos Aires, Argentina
Phone: 5411-4379-9000/10
Fax: 5411-4381-6075

  • Responsible for developing and enforcing health regulations.
Ministerio de Economia
Hipolito Yrigoyen 250
Capital Federal
1310 Buenos Aires, Argentina
Phone: 5411-4349-5000/5010/5020
  • Responsible for facilitating economic growth.

Secretaria de Communicaciones
Balcarce 50
Capiital Federal
1000 Buenos Aires, Argentina
Phone: 5411-4344-3850/53

  • Responsible for developing and implementing communications regulations as well as monitoring the deregulation of the telecommunications industry.

Secretaria de Ambiente y Desarrollo Sustentable
San Martin 459
Capital Federal
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Phone: 5411-4348-8200
Fax: 5411-4348-8288

  • Responsible for regulating environmental quality control, contamination control and the conservation of soil, flora and fauna, native forestry and fish and wildlife.

Ministerio de Defensa
Azopardo 250
1328 Buenos Aires, Argentina
Phone: 5411-4346-8800

  • Responsible for the enforcement of the national defense regulations and the planning, direction and implementation of productive activities where the state intervention is necessary to ensure national defense.

Instituto Nacional de Vitivinicultura
Av. San Martin 430
5500 Mendoza, Argentina
Departamento Relaciones Institucionales y Prensa-Sector Biblioteca
Tel: 54-261-4496390
Fax: 54-261-449-6304/06

  • Responsible for wine and wine product controls during all phases, from production to entering the marketplace.

Direccion General de Aduanas
Azopardo 350
Capital Federal
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Tel: 5411-4331-7606/7635
Fax: 5411-4334-5044

  • Responsible for the enforcement of import and export controls and the collection of duties and taxes.

Camara Argentina de Comercio
Av. Leandro N. Alem 36
1003 Buenos Aires, Argentina
Phone: 5411-5300-9000
Fax: 5411-5300-9058

  • Responsible for promoting international trade and providing consulting services to Argentine businesses interested in importing or exporting.

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